Home > My Fiction > ONLY SUPERHUMAN: Introducing Emerald Blair

ONLY SUPERHUMAN: Introducing Emerald Blair

At Shore Leave this weekend, I got to talk publicly for the first time about some of the details of Only Superhuman, and now I’m going to share them here, along with some character sketches I also showed at the convention.

Only Superhuman takes place roughly a century from now in the Main Asteroid Belt of the Solar System.  The Belt inhabitants, called Striders (corruption of earlier “stroiders”), have had to embrace human modification through genetics, bionics, etc. to survive the radiation and microgravity of space.  Many soon went beyond mere survival to explore more extensive “mods” (a term that came to apply to transhumans themselves as well as their enhancements), effectively giving themselves superpowers.  Naturally, some individuals, groups, and nations began using these powers for personal gain at the expense of others, or clashing with rivals at the expense of innocent bystanders.  But who would help the victims?  The Striders are a highly nationalist bunch, suspicious of outside authority.  Space habitats must be tightly controlled, regimented environments, and Striders accept the need for that to preserve their own homes, but assert their independence by being highly resentful of foreign or outside authority.  The sheer diversity of the Strider populations (for different asteroids’ distinct orbits, resources, and the like promote the development of distinct cultures) also keeps them from getting along.  As such, any attempt to get Striders involved in law enforcement outside their own local jurisdiction is problematical, and the Belt is a rather lawless place.

But just as there were some mods who used their transhuman abilities for harm, there were some who chose to use them to help and protect their neighbors in times of need.  These special few (at least, those capable and powerful enough to survive the attempt) came to be known as Troubleshooters, and soon gained a reputation in the public eye as larger-than-life, romanticized figures, essentially superheroes.  But the Troubleshooters could only do so much as individuals, and sometimes clashed over methods and jurisdiction.  Eventually, the greatest of the Troubleshooters organized the rest (at least, those who would agree to follow the rules) into the Troubleshooter Corps (TSC), a non-governmental organization promoting and coordinating their efforts.  Knowing that the Striders would resist their aid if they presented themselves as a paramilitary or mercenary group, they embraced their media image as superheroes — colorful, flamboyant celebrity crimefighters with distinctive costumes and code names, role models that people could look up to and trust implicitly.

The newest Troubleshooter is 22-year-old Emerald Blair, nicknamed the Green Blaze:

Emerald Blair, "Green Blaze"

Copyright Christopher L. Bennett

In many ways, “Emry” Blair is an ideal Troubleshooter recruit: your classic superheroine, a hot redhead with ample muscles and ample curves.  She’s got superhuman strength, senses, reflexes, endurance, healing ability, and intelligence (though not necessarily judgment).  She’s even got the obligatory tragic past motivating her heroics — a past that includes several years as a juvenile delinquent and mod-gang member called Banshee.  This was a rebellion against her father, who was once a member of the Vanguard habitat-nation.  The Vanguardians were the first human community to embrace transhuman mods beyond mere survival needs and the first to use their augmented abilities to protect people; as such, they were considered the first real superheroes.  But they got too ambitious and heavy-handed.  Public opinion turned on them and they retreated to the outer reaches of the Belt to live in isolation as the Strider community grew without them.

But now they’re back.  And they’re apparently in bed with other mod nations known for unsavory or unethical practices.  The Troubleshooters, under new leadership, send the Green Blaze to infiltrate them, playing on her family ties to find out what they’re up to, if anything.  But the last thing Emry wants is to confront that side of her past.  And she’s uneasy about the Corps going after people who haven’t done anything yet.  Is it a way of heading off trouble before it comes, or something more dangerous?  Emerald Blair is caught between two factions seeking to bring their own brand of order to the Striders, and in the process she’s forced to confront the tragedies of her own past and decide what kind of superhuman — and what kind of person — she will become.

Emerald Blair portrait

Copyright Christopher L. Bennett

Why “Emerald Blair?”  Well, because I thought “Emerald” would be a cool name for a character (green is my favorite color), and I decided to create one.   I had recently (back in 1988 when this began) had the idea to explore superpowers in a scientifically plausible way, so I decided Emerald would be a superhuman operative.  I picked the Solar System frontier in the early 2100s because it was a setting I hadn’t explored before — and ultimately it ended up meshing rather well with the transhuman elements of the concept. I chose “Blair” as a name that was neither too ordinary (like the gazillion characters with exotic first names and the last name “Jones,” from Cyrano to Indiana to Cleopatra) or too exotic.  I’m not sure where it specifically came from (maybe just from repeating “Emerald blank” to myself to sound out the rhythm), but it struck a happy medium.

For the first 15 years, she was just Emerald “Emry” Blair, no other name.  But when I abandoned my initial Troubleshooterspec novel, rethought everything from the ground up, and decided to embrace the superhero elements of the concept more fully, that left Emry in need of a code name.  Perhaps “Green Blaze” is unimaginative, too much of a riff on her real name, but I didn’t want to go too far afield, and it’s not as if Troubleshooters’ identities are secret (not most of them, anyway).   Plus it evokes a lot of classic costumed heroes — Green Lantern, Green Arrow, Green Hornet, Green Goblin (hey, at least one version of Gobby has been heroic).

Emerald Blair (profile)

Copyright Christopher L. Bennett

Yes, these drawings are my own work, done in pencil and colored pencil.  The full-face portrait was finished in 2002 (though I did several earlier drafts over the preceding 5-6 years), the profile (my favorite) done in 2003.  The full-length “Green Blaze” portrait is a mostly digital reworking, finished in 2011, of a 2002 drawing done before I’d fully embraced the superhero idea (so her costume was not quite so flashy there).  Since this is that design modified to fit my new ideas, I see it as more an approximation, a concept sketch, than an authoritative Green Blaze costume design (although it is consistent with the costume details mentioned in the novel).  But as far as the face and physique are concerned, these are the drawings that guided how I described Emerald in Only Superhuman.

Emerald’s face is inspired by my best friend from college, but I used a photo of an actress from a magazine for reference and adjusted the features from memory (it was a photo from the late ’80s, hence the big hair — just assume she’s in very low gravity).  The hair color is inspired by a different girl I knew in high school, and I’m rather proud of how it turned out in the original portrait, though I’m not sure the colors came through quite right in the scans, especially the profile.  Ideally it should evoke the colors of autumn leaves.   Emry’s physique in the full-length portrait is modeled on tennis star Serena Williams, although Emry is a few inches shorter.  I wanted Emry to be both muscular and voluptuous, but in a realistic way rather than a comic-book exaggeration, and in a functional way like a working athlete rather than the display-oriented build of a female bodybuilder.  I like the contrast between Emry’s dainty, elfin face and her powerful body.

I have no idea if Emry will look like this on the novel’s cover, or if she’ll be on the cover at all.  That’s up to the Tor art department.  But my editor has my sketches.  And at least the readers of my blog will know what she looks like in my mind.

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