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Archive for August 26, 2014

A few random STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS observations (Spoilers)

I decided tonight that it was time I got around to watching Star Trek Into Darkness a second time, now that it’s on Netflix streaming. There’s a lot in the movie that I like and a lot I don’t, and as is so often the case with movies these days, most of the stuff I don’t like is in the third act, the one where story logic tends to give way to the relentless Hollywood pressure for action and spectacle. There are so many movies that are excellent in the first two acts and deteriorate in the third, and this is one of them, although there’s still some good stuff mixed in. The attempt to copy The Wrath of Khan‘s radiation-room sequence, in particular, is the worst idea in the film bar none, to the point that it overshadows the rest in people’s minds and makes them remember the film as more derivative than it actually is; but once they get past the “Ship out of danger” line, they actually return the focus where it belongs, to the story of this movie and its character arcs, so from that point on it kinda works. (At least until the “KHAAAAAAANNNN!!” moment, which is even stupider here than it was in TWOK, and it was painfully stupid there.)

John Cho is kind of wasted as Sulu. He’s an amazingly good actor and should be a leading man in his own right. The whole cast is good, and a large part of what makes these movies work (when they do work, which is often enough that I can forgive the parts that don’t), but he’s a particular standout, at least in proportion to his screen time.

One part that I’m afraid doesn’t work for me that well is the musical score. Which is strange, since I usually love Michael Giacchino’s work. But I just find his Trek theme kind of ponderous and melodically awkward. I don’t like its chord progressions; they’re too minor and kind of discordant. It’s inoffensive enough when I first hear it, but then it gets stuck in my head afterward and I really, really don’t like having it there and want to drive it out with something else. It’s like a food that leaves a bad aftertaste. I don’t want to dislike it, but somehow this is one Giacchino theme that just misfires for me. Partly because it doesn’t do what he does so well, which is to emulate the sound of a classic production while still bringing his own voice to it. His Mission: Impossible scores evoke the flavor of Lalo Schifrin’s and do a good job incorporating Schifrin’s themes. His Incredibles score was a fantastic homage to John Barry’s James Bond scores. His theme to Sky High was a classic superhero motif that could’ve easily been a Superman theme. His score for Dawn of the Planet of the Apes evoked Goldsmith’s and Rosenman’s scores to the originals. But his Star Trek scores just don’t sound like Star Trek music most of the time. They have their moments; aside from the arrangement of the Courage theme in the end titles, STID quoted a very tiny snippet of Gerald Fried’s “Ritual” cue from “Amok Time” when Spock was fighting Khan in the climax, and the earlier fight with Kirk, Scotty, and Khan against the Vengeance guards had a score that did evoke the style of various TOS scores. But the main theme and most of the scoring don’t fit the style of prior Trek at all. For that matter, they don’t even sound particularly Giacchino-like to me. It’s really disappointing that the only scores I don’t like from one of my favorite modern film composers are the ones for my favorite franchise.

At the end of the credits, I noticed the American Humane Society “no animals were harmed” credit — which I assume is only included in films that featured animals. But the only animals I remember seeing in the film were an alien riding animal and fish on Nibiru, a tribble, and the sick little girl’s stuffed rabbit. Does the AHS protect imaginary animals too?

Also, Khan stated that the Enterprise‘s life support control was “behind the aft nacelle.” This is a neat trick considering that, A, the ship is symmetrical and neither nacelle is aft of the other, and B, the only thing behind either nacelle is outer space. (I’m laughing at the superior intellect!)

UNCERTAIN LOGIC: Draft is done (almost)

I haven’t posted in a while since I’ve been focused on getting Uncertain Logic done. I just wrapped up the first draft today… a day after my nominal deadline. Unfortunately I suffered a schedule setback: I decided a while back to split the process into two phases, first finishing up the A plot of the book, then going back and filling in the independent B plot. The problem is, the A plot ended up considerably longer than I’d expected, so I had to rethink the B plot and trim it down substantially. Which is okay, since I’ve planned this all along as a 2-book arc, so it’s just a matter of moving elements of it to Book 4. Which I think will actually work better, because then there’s something new to be revealed in Book 4 rather than just having it be the fallout from all that was discovered in Book 3. But the need to pause and re-plot this storyline for Book 3 threw me off schedule. Fortunately, I was able to get an extension from my editor, which kept me from stressing out too much like I did when I was pushing against the deadline on Book 2. So I’m really grateful to Margaret for that.

As it happened, I finished the B plot’s climax yesterday and then spent today on the denouement — then quickly arrived at a solution to a flaw I’d recognized in the climax of the A plot, which left a couple of the main characters a little too passive. I have to thank Marco Palmieri for inadvertently helping me realize the problem; during the “Villain’s Journey” panel at Shore Leave a few weeks ago, someone asked him his thoughts on what defined a good villain, and he said (paraphrasing), “Good villains are defined by the choices they force the heroes to make.” That reminder, that stories are about choices rather than simply events, pointed me in the right direction, not only to improve the climax of the A plot, but to decide what really needed to happen in the B plot climax as well.

One way I helped myself, meanwhile, was by periodically going over to the university campus to work. Getting out of my chair and getting some exercise and a change of scenery helps, and being away from my DSL connection means I don’t get as distracted by the Internet while I’m trying to work (although having a smartphone now has cut into that a bit). I’ve actually done it twice in the past three days. On Sunday, I decided to bike over to campus. That’s right, I’m finally getting back into cycling after letting my bike sit dormant for a couple of years, since I really need to get back into shape. This was my first big excursion, the first ride that wasn’t just over to the nearby park and a bunch of laps around the footpath. I kind of bit off more than I could chew, since I’d forgotten what an uphill climb it was to get home from the part of campus I rode to, so I mostly had to walk my bike back uphill. I was pretty sore after that. But I got a good amount of work done. I packed a lunch and went over to the main campus library, not realizing that it wouldn’t open until noon; but I sat in the shade in the outdoor study area next to the library and got a scene or two written there, then had my lunch, then went into the library and got some more done, finding my way toward the climax — though I was too tired after I got home to finish it that day.

Anyway, I got through the climax yesterday at home, but still didn’t quite have the denouement solved until this morning. But today was apparently the day that the apartment building had the railings on its entranceway stairs replaced, so that made a lot of noise outside my apartment. So I took a walk up to Panera to work over lunch and finish the B plot, then I figured out that fix for the A plot on the walk from there to the nearest campus library, where I wrote that additional scene, then paged through the whole thing and figured out chapter breaks (tentatively). Oh, and I put back in a couple of character-moment scenes that I’d pulled out for length, once I determined I’d have room for them. There are a couple more scenes I wish I could put back in, but they’re not really essential, they probably slow the pacing too much in the early chapters, and I’m pushing the maximum word count enough as it is.

So now comes the polishing, where hopefully I can trim out excesses, flesh out the bits that need it, refine the timing of events, and maybe find improvements for some tentative elements. I’m hoping to get that done by the end of the month. But I think it’s turned out reasonably well so far. Streamlining the B plot helps keep it more focused as well as cutting down on the clutter the book might otherwise have had. And it lets the A plot have the space it needs. (And since it’s a 2-book arc, any imbalance in character emphasis in this book can be complemented in the next.) More basically, I made a point of telling a story that challenged the characters more and raised the personal stakes and consequences higher than Tower of Babel did, while still keeping the astropolitical stakes high and adding new complications and new antagonists to the Rise of the Federation milieu. I think I’ve improved considerably on the previous volume, though I hope I can improve it a bit more over the next few days.

And after this, I really need to keep my momentum going if I can. I want to get Book 4 outlined as soon as possible so I can hopefully get ahead of schedule for once, as well as knowing if events from Book 4 will require me to make any changes to Book 3 in copyedits. Plus I’m hoping to come up with a new pitch or two for my next Trek project after Book 4, and there are some original projects I hope I can get around to in the months ahead.

Oh yeah… and I really have to come up with a title for Book 4 sooner or later, don’t I?

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