Home > Reviews, Star Trek > A few random STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS observations (Spoilers)

A few random STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS observations (Spoilers)

I decided tonight that it was time I got around to watching Star Trek Into Darkness a second time, now that it’s on Netflix streaming. There’s a lot in the movie that I like and a lot I don’t, and as is so often the case with movies these days, most of the stuff I don’t like is in the third act, the one where story logic tends to give way to the relentless Hollywood pressure for action and spectacle. There are so many movies that are excellent in the first two acts and deteriorate in the third, and this is one of them, although there’s still some good stuff mixed in. The attempt to copy The Wrath of Khan‘s radiation-room sequence, in particular, is the worst idea in the film bar none, to the point that it overshadows the rest in people’s minds and makes them remember the film as more derivative than it actually is; but once they get past the “Ship out of danger” line, they actually return the focus where it belongs, to the story of this movie and its character arcs, so from that point on it kinda works. (At least until the “KHAAAAAAANNNN!!” moment, which is even stupider here than it was in TWOK, and it was painfully stupid there.)

John Cho is kind of wasted as Sulu. He’s an amazingly good actor and should be a leading man in his own right. The whole cast is good, and a large part of what makes these movies work (when they do work, which is often enough that I can forgive the parts that don’t), but he’s a particular standout, at least in proportion to his screen time.

One part that I’m afraid doesn’t work for me that well is the musical score. Which is strange, since I usually love Michael Giacchino’s work. But I just find his Trek theme kind of ponderous and melodically awkward. I don’t like its chord progressions; they’re too minor and kind of discordant. It’s inoffensive enough when I first hear it, but then it gets stuck in my head afterward and I really, really don’t like having it there and want to drive it out with something else. It’s like a food that leaves a bad aftertaste. I don’t want to dislike it, but somehow this is one Giacchino theme that just misfires for me. Partly because it doesn’t do what he does so well, which is to emulate the sound of a classic production while still bringing his own voice to it. His Mission: Impossible scores evoke the flavor of Lalo Schifrin’s and do a good job incorporating Schifrin’s themes. His Incredibles score was a fantastic homage to John Barry’s James Bond scores. His theme to Sky High was a classic superhero motif that could’ve easily been a Superman theme. His score for Dawn of the Planet of the Apes evoked Goldsmith’s and Rosenman’s scores to the originals. But his Star Trek scores just don’t sound like Star Trek music most of the time. They have their moments; aside from the arrangement of the Courage theme in the end titles, STID quoted a very tiny snippet of Gerald Fried’s “Ritual” cue from “Amok Time” when Spock was fighting Khan in the climax, and the earlier fight with Kirk, Scotty, and Khan against the Vengeance guards had a score that did evoke the style of various TOS scores. But the main theme and most of the scoring don’t fit the style of prior Trek at all. For that matter, they don’t even sound particularly Giacchino-like to me. It’s really disappointing that the only scores I don’t like from one of my favorite modern film composers are the ones for my favorite franchise.

At the end of the credits, I noticed the American Humane Society “no animals were harmed” credit — which I assume is only included in films that featured animals. But the only animals I remember seeing in the film were an alien riding animal and fish on Nibiru, a tribble, and the sick little girl’s stuffed rabbit. Does the AHS protect imaginary animals too?

Also, Khan stated that the Enterprise‘s life support control was “behind the aft nacelle.” This is a neat trick considering that, A, the ship is symmetrical and neither nacelle is aft of the other, and B, the only thing behind either nacelle is outer space. (I’m laughing at the superior intellect!)

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  1. August 27, 2014 at 5:34 am

    There is the Mutara McGuffin.

    Sorry.

    I agree with you, generally. I liked that they showed consequences to the vreaking of the prime directive, at the start.

    I though the “Khaaaaan” in the first moie worked, because Ricardo Montelban was so good. There was a shamefully underused actor.

  2. Gary
    August 28, 2014 at 6:42 pm

    Christopher,

    Have you ever thought of reviewing TMP on out through Nemesis?

  3. Jakub Marek
    August 30, 2014 at 5:16 am

    Ad AHS: There is a dog in the beginning, right after main title…

  4. September 7, 2014 at 4:34 pm

    The Harewoods’ residence, yes. The opening bedroom scene with Noel Clarke and Nazneen Contractor.

    Speaking of under-used actors, having seen those two at work on other TV series? Contractor and Clarke definitely qualify!

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