Home > Uncategorized > Making a spectacle of myself

Making a spectacle of myself

It’s finally happened — my vision has deteriorated to the point that I can no longer read easily without glasses. So here’s a “selfie” of me with my new progressive bifocals:

Self portrait

And yes, I need a haircut. Shut up.

I’d been a little concerned about how rapidly my vision was blurring, so I went to the eye doctor associated with the store both to get a new prescription and to make sure there wasn’t anything serious causing the change. The doctor didn’t find any problems beyond normal aging and eye fatigue. Part of the problem was that I’d had my sleep mask too tight, which affected my eye pressure and made it temporarily hard to focus. Which may have contributed to eye fatigue later in the day, I suppose. And maybe it’s not so much that my vision was rapidly getting blurrier as that I was noticing it more and worrying about it more. But apparently all I needed was new glasses, and more care to avoid eye fatigue and dryness.

The progressive lenses cost a lot, but they give me three levels of focus — up close for reading, medium for my computer screen, and distant — and given how much I use my computer, I needed that. Evidently a lot of people who wear normal bifocals need a second pair of glasses just for the computer, and that would’ve been even more expensive. (At the moment, I’m managing well enough seeing the screen without glasses, but it comes and goes, depending on how tired my eyes are, I guess, as well as how fine the print is.)

You know how that one glasses place used to have a slogan promising glasses in an hour? Well, they don’t play that up anymore. I was told my glasses would be ready in an hour, so I went off to have lunch and pick up a few groceries, and when I got back 75 minutes later, they kept me waiting — then told me that they’d stripped a screw trying to remove it from the frames I’d picked out, thus ruining the frames, so they had to get a duplicate from another store, adding another 24 hours to the preparation time. So I had to go home and come back the next day — a pretty long drive, too. I asked if there was a discount or refund for the delay, but apparently the one-hour thing is no longer a guarantee, if it ever was; the best they could manage was to give me a free lens-cleaning kit.

Honestly, I don’t even like these frames that much — I prefer something rounder, but apparently angular is fashionable this year, so this was about the closest I could find. But they look okay in the above picture, I guess. The last time I got new lenses, I was able to save money by reusing my old frames. That wouldn’t have worked this time, since I needed to wear my old glasses to drive home — both times, since the store clerk told me I shouldn’t drive in my bifocals until I’d had time to get used to the shifting focus and distortions they create. (The drawback of no-line, progressive-focus lenses is that there are out-of-focus wedges on the sides of the lower half, a consequence of the construction process, evidently.) So he advised me to wait until the next morning before starting to wear them.

So that’s what I did, although I wore them a bit that night to read in bed. It was kind of weird having different areas of focus in my field of view, but over the day, I learned how to direct my gaze/tilt my head to bring things into focus. But it didn’t really come together until I braved the cold to walk to the local drugstore for a new watch battery. Bad timing that my watch happened to die just when I wasn’t supposed to go driving. I suppose I could’ve driven in my old glasses, but it might confuse my brain to go back and forth, I guess. But I think going for a walk helped me adjust; before long, I seemed to be perceiving the world around me pretty normally and not noticing the distortions, as if my brain were learning to compensate. And the glasses definitely helped me see the tiny screws on the back of my watch; I don’t know if I could’ve changed the battery successfully without them.

The biggest problem I experienced yesterday was that the temples weren’t quite adjusted right; the ends of them were digging into the sides of my head, and the nose pieces were uncomfortable too. But this morning I carefully, delicately bent the temples to a configuration closer to those on my old glasses, and so far they seem more comfortable, with the weight/pressure distributed across more of my head rather than just digging into those two points — and I think it’s shifted some of the weight away from the nose pieces, so hopefully those will be more comfortable too.

Which is good, since it seems I’m going to need to wear glasses most of the time now. I wish there were a better way to restore vision, like some kind of eye drops that would reverse the age-related stiffening of the lenses, make them pliable again and easier to refocus. I know there’s lasik surgery, but that’s probably a lot more expensive than glasses, and it would probably just give you one particular focal length rather than letting you shift focus as needed.

Although the real problem, ultimately, is all this “getting older” nonsense. I still think of myself as 20-something, but my body persists in seeing it differently. I wish I could win it over to my way of thinking.

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Categories: Uncategorized
  1. TheNewNo2
    February 13, 2015 at 1:22 pm

    Glasses styles confuse me. I don’t understand why large and thick frames are suddenly the order of the day when what I want is something as minimal as possible. Why was that fine two years ago but not now?

    • February 13, 2015 at 2:01 pm

      Don’t ask me to explain fashion. If something is good one year, there’s no reason it shouldn’t be good the next.

      Although I guess I can understand fashion from an anthropological standpoint. Probably new designs are favored because the ability to buy new things for frivolous reasons, rather than out of need, is a sign of prosperity and success, and thus those who are able to do so are socially favored. Whether those new things are objectively better than the old is beside the point. What’s important, to those who care about fashion, is that they’re distinct enough to be recognizably recent.

      Which can, of course, be frustrating for those of us who want to pick things out because we actually like them, and who want to stick with them indefinitely.

  2. February 20, 2015 at 2:48 am

    I had the same issue with aging eyes and have had progressive lenses for a few years. It took awhile to train my self how much I needed to tilt my head depending on how far away something was to get the correct part of the lens. With a change in jobs and desk set up I had to buy a second pair of classes just for computer use at work. I either had to tilt my head back all day or remove my classes and bring the screens up right to my face.

  1. March 11, 2015 at 1:45 pm

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