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Archive for October, 2015

Things are starting to look up a bit…

The best news this week: Not only did I deposit my final advance check for DTI: Time Lock yesterday, but I was just informed that my outline for Star Trek: The Face of the Unknown has been approved and the check is already being processed. I’m glad not only because I need the money, but because my plan was to devote October to original projects and then begin on TFOTU in November, but we’re not supposed to start writing the manuscripts until the outlines are approved. So now I’ll be able to stick with that plan. At the moment I’m proofreading the galleys for Rise of the Federation: Live by the Code, but I’ll get to TFOTU as soon as that’s done. (Although I didn’t get as much done on original projects as I’d hoped, what with my computer issues and illness and some still-unresolved problems with a story I was trying to salvage.)

I also finally got my replacement watchband the other day. It’s taking some getting used to, but it’s working okay. And because of the mixup, the company sent me a second band as a bonus, so I have a replacement for this one if anything should happen to it. Although it’s a pretty sturdy nylon band, so I doubt I’ll need a replacement anytime soon.

I made my first foray into laptop shopping yesterday, but I basically learned that it might be more challenging than I thought to find a reasonably priced model that has the software I need. The place I got my current laptop installs MS Office and a few other programs for no extra charge, but I don’t trust them anymore, certainly not after their 90-dollar “repair” did nothing to fix the problem and just made the performance worse overall. But apparently Staples laptops just come with Windows and nothing else, although you do get a discount if you buy Office along with them. Still, I need to try other possibilities. There are the obvious big stores like Best Buy to consider, but are those really the best options, especially for someone on a budget? The local place did have some appealing qualities, like the free software installation; it’d be nice to find some similar local shop in the Cincinnati area that’s more reliable.

In the wake of the useless “repair,” my laptop is now even worse at playing streaming video than it was before. Hulu is very jerky on Chrome, and ever since I let the computer upgrade Flash the other day, Firefox won’t play Hulu at all, since the Flash just crashes. I should probably just uninstall Flash and rely on HTML5, which is what people recommend online, but I’m not sure what the right way to do that is. Anyway, for now I’m effectively Hulu-less, which is a problem since there are a few shows this week that I skipped watching live because I expected to be able to watch them via On Demand cable, but the On Demand channel isn’t updating this week for some reason. I’m almost to the point of trying to watch Hulu on my tiny smartphone screen and seeing if that works. (If only I’d accepted the phone store’s limited-time offer to get a tablet along with the phone for an extra 50 bucks.) Or I could just try living with the jerky picture.

I’m still having the occasional freeze-up of my laptop. The last time it happened, I checked and confirmed that the hard-drive light was not on at all. Based on the searches I’ve done, that suggests that the freeze may be related to a hardware problem with the RAM, a bad sector or connection or something. I’ve been thinking of taking it in to the local repair shop (not the same as the place I bought it) and seeing if they can fix the RAM — and maybe install some more to improve my video-streaming performance. But I hesitate to spend money on a repair that may not work or that may just lead to the conclusion that I need to buy a new laptop anyway.

Granted, with my check coming in soon, I don’t need to be so reticent about spending money anymore. But I don’t want to spend too profligately either. I’m still feeling kind of burned after throwing away 90 bucks on a non-solution. That’s why I made sure to approach my Staples visit as a purely factfinding expedition. I’m not very good at making on-the-spot decisions, and a couple of times now (with my watch and the laptop) I’ve let store clerks talk me into choices that turned out to be the wrong ones. So I want to make sure I consider all the possibilities before deciding what to do about laptops. Which means I may be stuck with this one for a while longer. I just hope it holds up.

Health report

October 25, 2015 5 comments

Physical health: Perhaps inevitably, I seem to have picked up a nasty cold at Books by the Banks, so I’ve been trying to rest all week and have plenty of tea with honey, chicken soup, etc. I haven’t been able to focus much on writing. I’m also behind on my laundry, both from not being physically up to it and not having enough quarters.

Computer health: My computer’s been mostly running okay with Vista, although some sites like Facebook and io9 sometimes show up weirdly in Chrome, with bits of text and picture appearing like patchwork in the wrong places. I can clear it up by hitting Ctrl-A to highlight the whole page and then clearing the selection. Firefox works okay as long as I just use it for Netflix streaming (I’m nearing the end of a Leverage binge-rewatch). But yesterday, my computer froze while I was in Chrome, the first time that’s happened. The freezes seem to happen when I start to load something, though I can’t lock down just what sort of thing is triggering it. This time, it was when I followed a Facebook link to some news site. It may have been an ad or script on that site that triggered it. Anyway, it drives home that I still can’t trust my laptop. But the new mail client is working fine, at least. And fortunately that part where my keyboard caught fire while I was using it turned out to be a dream.

EDIT: Okay, I just had a second freeze in Chrome. It happened when I tried to close a tab containing an article I’d opened from Facebook. Come to think of it, that may be what happened last time too, since I have a visual memory of the cursor freezing up at the top of the screen. In both cases, then, it would mean that I had Facebook itself open in the first tab and I was trying to close the article in a second tab and go back to the Facebook tab. So could Facebook be the common thread somehow? Perhaps I should avoid going there except on my phone. Or at least avoid opening links from there.

Financial health: One of my overdue Star Trek writing advances is finally on its way to me, and I’m told that the other, larger advance I’ve been awaiting should be coming soon. So hopefully I’ll be able to buy a new laptop before much longer.

Career health: Hard to say. I just submitted my spec novel to an editor I’d really like to work with, but it’ll probably be a long time before I get a reaction to it, since editors are busy people. I’m still waiting for answers about another project I’m hoping to pursue.

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Oh, for crying out loud…

October 19, 2015 3 comments

Remember how I sent my watch to the manufacturer for a new band and they had it for a month without fixing it? Remember how I ordered a new band from an online company? Well, I got my order today… and they sent the wrong band. My order number ended in 19, and they enclosed the band and receipt that went with the next order, the one ending in 20, which is the wrong size and color. Now I have to find out how to send it back. I wonder if the person this band was meant for got my band instead, or if this mixup extends beyond just the two of us (e.g. everybody in a certain stretch getting the order one digit above theirs). In any case, I still have to go that much longer before I can finally start wearing the right watch again.

Although this is a minor frustration after the day I’ve had wrestling with e-mail clients. First off, I finally figured out how to restore my entire Thunderbird profile from backup, complete with Gmail login info, RSS feeds, the works. But then Thunderbird froze up my computer the same way Firefox (also from Mozilla) has been doing. Okay, not terrible, since I was planning to replace Thunderbird with a different client anyway. I just wanted everything loaded into it so I could import the data into whatever I replaced it with. So I looked around for free options and decided to try Opera Mail, since I used to like the Opera browser. But I couldn’t get it to import all my data. It dumped all my incoming mail from various folders in Thunderbird into a single folder, and it didn’t seem to import my outgoing mail at all. I went looking online for info about how to deal with that issue, and found that apparently it’s impossible to get Opera Mail to import Thunderbird’s folder structure. So scratch Opera Mail. A couple of sites recommended eM Client, so I decided to try that. Lo, it imported my Thunderbird data quite easily, although it doesn’t handle RSS feeds. But for some reason, while I was checking my mail from my main e-mail account, it all got deleted from the server. (I know because I still had my browser open to the webmail page — it’s what I’ve been using in lieu of a reliable client.) Not to worry, it’s all downloaded into eM Client, but I no longer have a backup of it on the server and can’t read the old e-mails on my phone anymore. I’ve contacted the help line to see if there’s any way to undo the deletion, and hopefully I’ve adjusted the client’s settings so it won’t do that again. I think I can provisionally say my e-mail quest has had a tolerable outcome, but it was frustrating getting there.

I don’t know why it is that computers make me so angry and stressed when they misbehave. Maybe because there’s no person to react to and thus no incentive for self-restraint. Maybe my lack of computer savvy leaves me feeling lost and out of control, and I’ve always dealt very badly with that feeling. Or maybe it’s because I’ve become so dependent on my computer, so I’m terrified at the prospect of its failure. I’m starting to see the value of having multiple devices linked in a “cloud.” It leaves you less at the mercy of a single device’s vagaries.

So after dealing with my e-mail and watchband frustrations, I decided to clear my head by going for a walk, including a trip up to the nearby shoe store to get some new socks. And of course, they were out of the type and size I wanted. And the only other clothing stores in walking distance are specialty shops that don’t carry just plain white socks. Of course — why should anything go right for me today?

Well… a nice-looking young woman smiled at me in the park during my walk. So there’s that, at least.

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Books by the Banks report

Well, as I hoped, Books by the Banks did cheer me up after my recent computer woes. The reception on Friday night was at the Mercantile Library downtown, a pretty classy place. It was heavily attended, making it an unusually noisy gathering for a library, but they had a free buffet which constituted my dinner and included some nice strawberries and cheese among other things. My nametag got me recognized by author Jeff Suess, who had a story in one of the Star Trek: Strange New Worlds volumes, and we talked Trek for a while. I later chatted with a few other authors I met for the first time. And I briefly touched base with noted children’s book author Sharon Draper, who won one of the awards given out at the reception, and who was my 8th-grade English teacher back at Walnut Hills High School decades ago. I was rather surprised that she remembered me, and she had some nice things to say about me. Honestly I don’t remember 8th grade all that well myself. It was a pretty rough time in my life, and I was kind of an emotional wreck and an underachiever. It’s reassuring that one of my teachers from that time came away with positive memories of me.

Anyway, I couldn’t resist staying up until midnight on Friday to watch the series finale of Continuum on Syfy (a bit rushed, but effective), and I woke up too early the next morning. Generally when I do that, I get up for a bit to let the sheets cool down, go back to bed, then eventually drift off and sleep fairly late. But this time, I had to force myself to get up early enough to get to the convention center by 10, and my morning coffee barely left me functional enough to drive. I practically sleepwalked into the convention center, or so it felt to me, but I bought another cup of coffee and it did the trick — or at least helped me kick into my convention/interview mode where I’m more outgoing and talkative than I usually am with strangers.

The energy of the crowd may have helped too. It was unusually lively and well-attended this year, and people weren’t afraid to spend money on books. The main book I was there to sell this year was Rise of the Federation: Uncertain Logic, but they had a few copies of ROTF: Tower of Babel as well, plus about five print-on-demand trade-paperback editions each of Only Superhuman and TNG: Greater Than the Sum, neither of which I’ve seen in TPB before. It wasn’t a very Trek-oriented crowd overall, and I didn’t make much of a dent in the big pile of Uncertain Logic copies, but I sold out of both Only Superhuman and Tower of Babel and was down to two copies of GTTS by the end of the day (even though the TPB edition of it was the most expensive item on my table). And since I earned out my advance on Only Superhuman earlier this year, that means I made myself a few more bucks in royalties yesterday, although I won’t see them for another 6 or 7 months.

I also got to see a couple more acquaintances, including Mark Perzel of Cincinnati Public Radio (who interviewed me about Only Superhuman a few years back), local author Dan Andriacco (whom I’ve met at the library’s Ohioana reception and last year’s BbtB), and R. S. Belcher, another Strange New Worlds author whom I’ve met at Shore Leave, as well as a fellow Tor author whose novels include The Six-Gun Tarot and The Shotgun Arcana. So I got to have some nice conversations with them and with other authors and readers over the course of the day. All in all, it was a successful event and I had a good time. Though I was really worn out once I got home. Hopefully I finally caught up on my sleep last night, though I think maybe I’m still a little out of it.

But I’m definitely glad I bought a new winter coat the week before last, after my old one’s zipper broke. The weather was still warm when I bought it, but temperatures have plunged over the past few days, so my timing was pretty good.

I hate computers, and I think it’s mutual

October 16, 2015 7 comments

I posted last month about my computer problems. Since then, I’ve been living with the laptop’s shortcomings as best I could, but this week, I finally decided to take it in to the shop where I’d bought it four years ago, since I had the impression I could maybe get free maintenance there. Otherwise I wouldn’t have gone back there, since they haven’t given me a lot of reason to trust in their knowledge or resources in the past. But I was desperate enough to give it a try, and the guy convinced me that I might still be having problems from the malware that infected the laptop a couple of years ago and that I went to another place to clean up. He said the only solution was to wipe the whole thing and reinstall Windows from scratch. I had recently bought a large enough thumb drive to back up my documents and application data, just in case, so I agreed to let him do that, even though it would cost 89 dollars. I asked them not to install Avast as the antivirus, because I had a suspicion it was causing a lot of my problems.

When I got it back, it turned out that they’d upgraded my Windows XP to Vista without asking, since the laptop could run either and nobody supports XP anymore. According to my cousin on Facebook, Vista’s a lousy version of Windows, but I’m kinda stuck with it now. They also didn’t have any antivirus available other than Avast, which they assured me was safe in the stripped-down free version they install, so I reluctantly agreed to let them install that and see what happened. It actually does seem to lack the particular avastSvc.exe application that was demanding so many resources from my CPU before. Still, they waited until just before closing time to tell me their credit-card machine was broken and I’d have to pay cash. If they’d told me when they started to install the antivirus, I could’ve gone to the ATM and back before they closed. Instead, I had to come back the next morning to pay.

And I needed to, because the computer worrisomely rebooted itself spontaneously a few hours after I got it back. I hoped the guy could diagnose the problem, but all he could tell me was that he’d done a hardware check and found no problems. I also later discovered that the scroll bar on the side of my laptop’s touchpad no longer works, although the one on my main keyboard that I plug into the laptop when working at home is still working. At least it hasn’t spontaneously rebooted again.

But last night, Firefox froze my computer again, just like it was doing before. The 89-dollar reinstallation did not fix the main problem I needed it to fix. Even though it’s a completely new installation of Windows and Firefox and everything, the same problem is happening. And apparently their warranty only covers hardware, not software or labor, so I don’t think getting my money back is an option. Which sucks, since my latest novel advance check is overdue and money’s a bit tight for me at the moment. Which is why I’m not just buying a new laptop — though I’m starting to seriously think about it anyway.

Although the freeze didn’t seem to happen until I upgraded to the latest edition of Flash. I’ve heard that Flash is a bad program and should be removed, but I’m not sure how to do that, and several sites were giving me error messages about disabling the outdated Flash that came with the install, so I figured it would work as a stopgap, at least. Now I’m wondering if it caused the freeze, given the timing. But it could be coincidence. Anyway, I need to figure out how to uninstall Flash. I gather that Firefox is supposed to natively support HTML5 to play videos and that I don’t need Flash anyway. But some pages seem to say that there are sites that still use Flash by default and you have to do something or other to force them to use HTML5 and it’s all just so confusing!

Indeed, the whole reason I took it to the shop was because all this computer stuff is confusing to me and I hoped they would have the knowledge to fix my software problems for me. Instead, they just fell back on a few basic, broad-strokes moves, and I’m now slightly worse off than I was before. I don’t think I’d gain anything by going back there to ask for more help. I gave up on that place a long time ago and it was only in desperation that I tried going back there again, and it turned out poorly.

Granted, there was also the problem with the Thunderbird mail client erasing my outgoing mails, which may or may not have been fixed (I haven’t gotten around to testing it) — but I’ve decided I need to get a different client anyway, or just rely on webmail. Thunderbird has never gotten along with Gmail, and I can’t even remember the trick I used to get it to accept my Gmail account the first time. I’ve frequently been getting “invalid certificate” error boxes when Thunderbird tries to access my Gmail account (which I hardly use anyway, except as my logon for Google sites and cloud memory) and it’s very frustrating, because they keep cropping up despite every attempt to get the program to “permanently store this exception.” Plus Thunderbird seems to be demanding a lot of CPU usage. I’ve tried looking into alternative mail client programs, ones I can get for free, but I haven’t quite settled on a good one. (I wish Eudora were still around. That was my preferred client for a long time.)

So in short, my computer problems have not been fixed. I still don’t trust Firefox, and Netflix and Hulu videos play even worse on Chrome than they did before the reinstall. Ideally I need a new laptop, but in the meantime I’d appreciate any advice my readers could offer.

As if the computer woes weren’t bad enough, I’ve been dealing with other frustrations lately too. I finally found out that the watch manufacturer hadn’t repaired my watch band yet because they couldn’t find a replacement. I knew that type of band was no longer being sold separately, but I saw that new watches with that band were still being sold, so I expected the manufacturer would be able to supply a band or maybe just substitute a new watch. But they’d gotten nowhere, so I just asked them to send my watch back as it was. I got it back a week later, with the band even more broken than before (in transit, I guess). And I shopped online for a replacement band. The ones the company still offers for that model are the same kind of resin band that I disliked on my old watch (which I’ve been wearing as a stopgap for the past month or so) because they’re so fragile and prone to breakage — which makes no sense, because it’s supposed to be a super-durable, shock-resistant watch. The one I had before was a nylon band, but with resin attachments to the watch body, and it was the resin part that split. So I went shopping for nylon bands of the right size from different manufacturers, and I’ve ordered one that looks pretty good, though it won’t merge as smoothly with the “lugs” of the watch (the sticky-out metal bits that the band attaches to). I’m still waiting for that to arrive.

Also, I’ve been trying to rework an old, unsold original story for the umpteenth time. I’d given up on it years ago, but since I was able to salvage and sell a couple of other old unsold stories in the past couple of years (“The Caress of a Butterfly’s Wing” and the upcoming “Murder on the Cislunar Railroad”), I figured maybe I could save this one too. But so far, it’s still frustrating me. I was trying to tighten it up, both to make it flow better and to make it short enough for markets with a 10,000-word cutoff, but my attempts to combine scenes somehow ended up adding length, so I didn’t trim as much as I’d hoped. I tried cutting out the first scene and starting deeper in the story, but the new first scene has too much telling and not enough showing, and it needs a lot of work to function as an opening. Last night, I decided to abandon it and move on to another project. But maybe that was just my depression about the computer talking, because this morning, I thought of some fixes that might work. Still, it’s an iffy proposition, and I’m not in a great mood to tackle it right now.

Well, tonight is a reception for the author guests of Books by the Banks, and the public event is tomorrow. Hopefully getting to meet some of my fellow authors and readers will cheer me up.

Shatter-day

October 10, 2015 1 comment

Well, it’s finally happened. A few years ago, I made a post called “Murphy’s Law of glassware,” talking about how every set of drinking glasses I bought tended to suffer breakage until there was only one glass left, which then continued to survive indefinitely. I talked about how the oldest tumbler in the set, a black-tinted one with a narrow base, had lasted just about forever, since well before I moved out on my own. It was part of a set that I also have a few smaller glasses from, but it was the only tumbler-sized one. I had my morning orange juice in it every day as a matter of long habit, and I was rather attached to it for its sheer longevity. I knew it would probably break eventually, though, so I took a picture of it for reference in case I ever figured out how to search for a replacement online somewhere:

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(A much blurrier picture than I realized…)

Anyway, after lunch today, I was rinsing out an empty pickle jar, and it slipped out of my hands and caused a chain reaction that led to this:

 

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(A much, err, sharper picture.)

Now I have nothing left but the picture. All these years together, and one clumsy moment cost me my most stalwart and loyal beverage receptacle. And now I’m sad.

Sure, it was just a drinking glass. And I still have a few of its smaller siblings. But I take comfort in familiarity and habit, and this is the loss of something that’s been with me nearly every morning for as long as I can remember. It was my favorite glass and now it’s gone. (Though at least this time I was wearing shoes when a glass broke on the floor.)

I’d be glad to track down some replacements of the same design if I could. I like the design. It’s simple yet distinctive, it’s got a nice dark hue, and the thick bases provide a lot of stability. But I have no idea how to search for replacements. Unlike the teacup I broke a while back, these glasses don’t have any label printed on them, so I don’t know the name of the design or the manufacturer. And the set is so old that I don’t know if they’re still being made. I tried an image search for similar glasses some time back, but had no luck. If there’s a way to refine or narrow the search, I don’t know how to do it. That’s part of why I’m posting this — I’m hoping someone will recognize the design or be able to point me in the right direction.

Glass is so frustrating. It’s such a marvelous material in so many ways — strong, stable, versatile, clear — and yet it’s so fragile at the same time. I wish someone would invent a way to modify its molecular structure so that it would briefly turn soft and flexible upon impact — sort of the opposite of those non-Newtonian fluids that turn semi-solid when struck. If glass would only bounce when dropped or struck rather than shattering, but remain just as strong and rigid the rest of the time, it would be perfect.

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I’ll be at Books by the Banks Oct. 17!

Sorry for the late notice… After missing out on it last year, I’ll be a guest at the Books by the Banks festival again this year. The event will be on Saturday, Oct. 17 from 10 AM to 4 PM at the Duke Energy Convention Center in downtown Cincinnati, on 525 Elm Street. Here’s the directions page with parking information. My featured book at the festival will be Star Trek: Enterprise — Rise of the Federation: Uncertain Logic, but hopefully there will be copies of my older books available as well.

Fall TV, Week 2 (spoilers)

First, a couple of updates, since my second looks at a number of shows have caused me to reappraise them:

Minority Report: I’m afraid episode 2 didn’t work as well for me as the pilot. There was some nice tech futurism (the microbiome analyzers were interesting, and the future version of a tablet is nice), but it wasn’t matched on a cultural level. All that pickup artist stuff and people using slang like “negging” and “booty call” is way, way too present-day for a show set 50 years from now, and that really damaged the credibility of the story and the world. It felt like a script for some ordinary, present-day cop show that was rewritten for this show. Which I doubt it really was, since it was written by the showrunner. But it doesn’t bode well for the quality of the mysteries — or the worldbuilding — going forward.

Some decent character work with Dash and Vega dealing with the aftermath of Dash killing the bad guy last week. I’m glad they addressed that instead of dismissing it. But I’m finding Stark Sands rather underwhelming as a lead. And the stuff about his inept attempts at detective work is getting old really fast.

Blindspot: I gave this one more chance, after reading an interview with the showrunner saying that there would be some major revelations this week.  I think I’m getting a little invested in it now, or at least curious enough to stick with it for the moment. Jaimie Alexander is definitely the main draw. Although it’s kind of nice to see Ashley Johnson — or rather, to hear her, since I know her mainly from her animation roles such as Gwen in Ben 10 and Terra in Teen Titans.

It’s occurred to me: We now have two series on the air, Dark Matter and Blindspot, that revolve around characters who’ve had their memories wiped and are wrestling with the question of whether they were good or bad people in their previous lives. And they’re both created by veterans of the Stargate franchise — Joe Mallozzi and Paul Mullie for the former, Martin Gero for the latter. Is there some causality there, or just coincidence?

The Muppets: I’m out. I was open to a more adult and “edgy” version of the Muppets, getting back to their roots in late-night TV, but last night’s episode was something I don’t think the Muppets have ever been before: mean-spirited and cynical. Kermit has become an angry, neurotic jerk, Fozzie is committing felonies, and the characters are just being generally nasty to each other, with no sign of the affection that always underlaid their squabbles in the past. It didn’t feel like a story about the Muppets; it felt like a generic modern sitcom plot acted out by the Muppets. Which is lame. If the Muppets are going to do something in the vein of a contemporary TV trend, they should be spoofing and subverting it (Veterinarian’s Hospital, Pigs in Space), not just playing it out by the numbers. More importantly, it just wasn’t very funny. In the pilot, I laughed a good number of times, but very little amused me here.

The one good point is that Pepe the King Prawn, the most annoying Muppet ever, was more subdued and less obnoxious here. But he was the only Muppet who was less obnoxious. And maybe it’s just symptomatic of the general out-of-character writing.

And now to the new stuff:

Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (Tuesdays, ABC): Pretty solid opening. Things have ramped up to a new level. More superpower action, new threats, new status quo for various characters. Daisy (formerly Skye) is looking pretty good in her action gear and new haircut. And a passel of movie references — nods to the alien attacks on New York, London, and Sokovia (though Ultron was kind of indirectly alien), an appearance by President Ellis, even a nod to “the Pym Technologies disaster.” (Which is perhaps an overstatement given that nobody died in that.) And the lines about the laws of man catching up with the laws of nature could be foreshadowing Captain America: Civil War.

Sleepy Hollow (Thursdays, FOX): This just screamed “soft reboot.” Last season ended with the core foursome reunited and standing together; now suddenly we learn they all went their separate ways and are only grudgingly coming back together, with Irving gone for good. That’s kind of an awkward transition. And the episode was so much about setting up the new status quo that it’s hard to get a sense of what the season will be like.

But while the core cast was still fun to watch, the episode felt like it was going through the motions. The Horseman was swept aside very cursorily. Abbie was given a new grizzled mentor figure to suffer a predictable, telegraphed death at the hands of a demon, like Sheriff Corbin 2.0, but we didn’t see any emotional aftermath to the event, any reaction from Abbie once the scene was over. Crane and Abbie cursorily reasserted their friendship, but the sense of deep warmth and connection between them wasn’t as strong. Crane was given a new Colonial-era love interest in Betsy Ross, but without the depth of feeling and need he had for Katrina — and so far, the only impressive thing about Nikki Reed in the role is that she makes Katia Winter seem interesting in comparison. And Jenny was just there to help out and make wisecracks. Before, it was the depth of feeling behind the characters and their relationships, the underlying passion, that made the show engaging and grounded its insanely silly plotlines. There didn’t seem to be any passion here.

Also, how is it that an experienced demon-hunter and FBI agent like Abbie can run into a woman named Pandora, who’s into ancient history and lore and who’s just arrived in Sleepy Hollow at the same time a new evil descends upon the town, and not immediately suspect that it’s the Pandora? That’s just dropping the ball.

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