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BUCK ROGERS IN THE 25TH CENTURY (S2) Reviews: “Mark of the Saurian”/”The Golden Man” (spoilers)

January 29, 2018 7 comments

“Mark of the Saurian” is the debut teleplay of Francis Moss, who would go on to write prolifically for animated TV shows including She-Ra, Dennis the Menace, Defenders of the Earth, and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. It begins by establishing the powerful Delta Quadrant Defense Station (same miniature used in season 1’s “Space Vampire”) as the key to the recent victory of the “Alliance” (which seems to have replaced last season’s equally nebulous “Federation”) over the enemy Saurians. But we see the station’s communications officer killed and replaced by a reptilian alien wearing a holographic disguise.

On the Searcher, Buck is bedridden with Cygnus fever, which his 20th-century metabolism isn’t immune to. Hawk goes off on patrol early to avoid the pomp and ceremony of the arrival of five Earth ambassadors going to finalize the Saurians’ surrender, including Ambassador Cabot (Linden Chiles) and Dr. Moray (Vernon Weddle), who’s somehow both a diplomat and a medical doctor. Buck watches on the monitor from sickbay and notices a green glow around the new arrivals. On learning that his nurse can’t see it, he staggers down to the flight deck and sees it in person. He keeps insisting something’s off about the ambassadors, but everyone else assumes he’s hallucinating, even when a burst of pain enables him to see the lizard person under Moray’s disguise. Moray and the others are all Saurian spies planning to infiltrate the Delta Defense Station.

But Moray uses a blood sample from Buck to engineer a fix for the spies’ holoemitters, while the others sabotage the Searcher to trap it on course into Delta’s exclusion zone. Buck seems “cured” of his hallucinations, but Wilma recognizes his description as matching a Saurian, a race he’s never seen before and thus can’t have hallucinated. Since Wilma figured this out, one would assume she would be the one to begin piecing together what’s going on… but in the next scene, she stands by passively and disbelievingly as Buck causes himself pain to try to see through Moray’s disguise, unsuccessfully.

So Buck is taken back to sickbay for his own safety, though he’s asked for Hawk to come back early from patrol. He then watches on his room’s screen while Ambassador Cabot helps Admiral Asimov convince the station’s head (Stacy Keach, Sr.) to disable the quadrant defenses and allow the ship to dock. Buck sees that the station’s comm officer still has the green glow, since he hasn’t recalibrated his emitter for Buck. So this man who’s been deemed dangerously delusional is able to waltz out of sickbay carrying the blaster that happened to be hanging in its holster by the door, then move unchallenged all the way to the bridge, where he holds everyone hostage to prove his theory. Hawk shows up just in time to back him up, and Buck turns down the thermostat to force the evil lizard men into hibernation, and once again the day is saved, early enough that the rest of the episode is padded out with a lengthy tag involving Crichton and Twiki debating the efficacy of bringing dead flowers to a sick human.

This feels like a first-season episode. It’s the first story this year that doesn’t make any attempt at theme, allegory, or commentary, just a simple good-vs.-evil gimmick story with one-note villains. It also seems to abandon John Mantley’s desire for a more vulnerable, imperfect Buck and return to his first-season characterization as the one guy who could solve the problem. I wonder if Gil Gerard was up to his old rewriting tricks again, because there are two parts here that make it seem like someone else is going to help and then they don’t. First it seemed like Wilma was figuring out the problem, but then she became passive while Buck did so. And they made such a point of Hawk leaving before the ambassadors arrived that I was sure they were setting up a plot beat of Hawk’s alien senses seeing through the disguises so that he could prove Buck right; but instead he just showed up at the climax to run interference for Buck’s grandstand play. It feels like the script was sloppily rewritten to give Wilma’s and Hawk’s contributions to Buck instead. (There’s also an odd bit where Wilma won’t let Cabot kiss her hand and Asimov berates her for giving offense, but her reasons for pulling away are never addressed. Maybe she was supposed to sense something off about Cabot, but it was lost in a rewrite.)

The episode does manage to pull off a bit of a Twilight Zone or horror movie feel in its first half – “I’m the only one who sees the monsters, but everyone else thinks I’m crazy!” But it stalls out just when it should get to the point where others start to believe the hero and join the fight, and it all kind of fizzles out. It’s also hurt by the show’s perennially poor alien makeup, although the Saurians’ rigid masks are infrequently seen due to the disguise gimmick.

Also, I realized something. Mantley told Starlog that he wanted to get away from season 1’s constant focus on interstellar war and spy missions and focus on the wider range of story subjects that a starship exploration show could offer. But so far, three out of four plots in season 2 have been driven in one way or another by warfare between humans and aliens. Only “The Guardians” has shown the Searcher doing any kind of searching or exploring.

Incidentally, Admiral Asimov finally defines Wilma’s role aboard the ship, introducing her to Cabot as “one of our executive officers.” It’s an elevated title, but a lot of the time, the writers seem to be treating her as little more than a communications officer, or just the token female in the crew. Although “Mark of the Saurian” is the first and only episode this season to give a prominent role to any Searcher crewwoman other than Wilma – namely Kim Hamilton as Nurse Paulton, who’s also the only black character in the episode. There’s also a bit role played by Andrea Pike as a random crew member with a single line, “Captain Rogers, do you need help?” Out of the entire season, they’re the only female Searcher personnel with credited roles or dialogue other than Wilma and a woman Buck was briefly flirting with in “Time of the Hawk” (and whose only line was “Yes, Colonel”). It’s quite a regression from season 1, which routinely featured capable, professional female characters in many walks of life.

“The Golden Man” is written by the second season’s supervising producer Calvin Clements, Jr. (who would go on to produce series including Airwolf, Dallas, MacGyver, and Walker, Texas Ranger) and its executive story consultant Stephen McPherson (whose most notable credit beyond Buck is as story editor on the short-lived Ben Vereen/Jeff Goldblum detective series Tenspeed and Brown Shoe from 1980).

The episode opens with the Searcher, a ship supposedly questing into the unknown reaches of deepest space, entering the “Alpha Centauri asteroid belt” (as in literally the nearest star system to Earth’s own) to answer a distress signal. They bring aboard a stasis pod holding a boy whose skin, hair, and clothes are all gold. Named Velis (David Hollander), he speaks with a maturity and precision beyond his age and asks for help locating another of his kind, Relcos, whose pod may have crashed on nearby Iris 7. But the Searcher, rather bizarrely, plows headlong into an asteroid as if nobody was bothering to steer the thing. Admiral Asimov is pinned under a fallen beam too heavy for four men to lift, until Velis touches it and makes it lighter, explaining that his people have the power to transmute the properties of metal.

The crew tries to unstick the ship from the asteroid, with Asimov ordering “reverse tractor beams” and Hawk contrarily calling them “reverse thruster beams” in reply, two or three times in a row. Hard to say which actor was misreading the script. But the ship is wedged in too tight to free it at its current mass. Velis says he’s too weak to make the whole ship lighter, but Relcos is big enough to do it. Buck takes Velis down to the planet to search. They have a deadline, since there’s a deadly magnetic storm closing in on the ship.

On Planet Universal Backlot, a crowd of scruffy villagers has captured the golden man Relcos (Russell Wiggins), who inadvertently changes the metal pitchforks and daggers thrust at him into jade, silver, and the like, which provokes various offscreen voiceover artists to exposit stiltedly about how amazed and excited they are at what he can do for them. But he turns the bars of his cage to glass and escapes. Soon Buck and Velis show up and are captured by the mob, placed in a prison where they’re confronted by colony leader Graf (Anthony James, who was the sympathetic Varek in “The Plot to Kill a City” last season). Graf wants the golden boy to lighten a crashed ship so the inmates can use it to escape. Velis is too small to do it, so Graf sends searchers out to find the big one. Meanwhile, Relcos has been found by a kindly farm boy and turns out to be frightened and childlike in his behavior. At this point, I groaned, realizing that this was one of those episodes where it turns out the aliens age backward.

Anyway, Hawk goes down to the planet disguised (by a robe) as a penal investigator and demanding that the visitors be brought to him safely. He tracks down an escaped Buck and Velis on his own, and eventually they find Relcos in the crowd’s custody and get him away, with Velis prompting Relcos to use his powers to fuse the city gate shut so they can escape. Up on the ship, Relcos uses his powers to lighten the Searcher enough to break free of the asteroid, with no mention of whether the change is permanent. (If it were, it’d make the ship a lot easier to accelerate, but probably more fragile.) The boy-sized Velis finally explains that the man-sized Relcos is his 5-year-old son. Ouch, I feel sorry for his wife! How would that even work? This is why I hate stories about backward-aging aliens.

So, yeah, this is a pretty silly one, another dumb sci-fi gimmick and another episode that’s just adventure with no theme or message or character exploration. I’m starting to suspect that John Mantley’s ambitions for a smarter show were quickly squashed by network suits wanting mindless action. There’s been a pretty consistent downward trend in quality all season, with each episode worse than the one before, and we’ve gone very quickly from a season premiere that reached Star Trek-level quality to a fifth episode that feels more like Lost in Space. At this rate, we’ll be hitting Galactica 1980 levels before long, so I pray there’s an upswing coming.

This is a good showing for Hawk, though, since he gets to be clever and resourceful and use his wits to try to get Buck out of a jam, even if it doesn’t quite pay off. I like it that the character who was introduced as a fierce alien warrior is turning out to be so thoughtful, witty, and quick to resort to brains over brawn, and characterized more by shrewd humor than aggression. Buck is his usual stalwart-hero self, but that’s starting to feel a bit one-note by this point. Wilma is underutilized, doing little more than relaying information from her bridge console. The other main Searcher characters have their usual bits and not much more, and Paul Carr leaves little impression in his final appearance as Devlin. On the plus side, Twiki is only briefly glimpsed in the teaser and has no lines whatsoever, a first for the series – although his current voice actor Bob Elyea has a minor on-camera role as an Iris 7 villager whose mother (the only speaking woman in the episode besides Wilma) tries to paint him gold to collect Graf’s reward for Relcos.

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