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Archive for May, 2018

WILD CYBERS: Kickstarter has ended

Well, my first Kickstarter has now ended. By yesterday morning, we’d succeeded in unlocking the fourth stretch goal, David Sherman’s novel Issue in Doubt, just over a day after unlocking the third. That gave me hope that in the final day, we’d make it to the fifth stretch goal level of $2400 and unlock a Bud Sparhawk short story as an additional bonus for our pledgers.

But we missed it by that much. The final tally of the Epic Science Fiction Adventures campaign is $2,383 from 87 backers. We could’ve made it to the fifth goal with just one more backer. Ah, well. Nonetheless, just short of $2400 is a pretty good haul for a campaign whose baseline funding goal was $800. We very nearly tripled that, which is a promising sign for the public’s interest in the books. Although it’s interesting how much of that activity was in the last 3 days of the month-long campaign. At times when the pledges were lagging, sometimes going for days without movement, I hoped that maybe people were just holding off until the end for whatever reason. I didn’t expect to be right about that, though, not to this extent. We ended up making considerably more than I would’ve anticipated just a few days ago.

So I’m very grateful to all the Kickstarter backers for their help in funding Among the Wild Cybers: Tales Beyond the Superhuman, and Bud Sparhawk’s new novel Shattered Dreams as well. I hope all 87 of you enjoy the books, and the digital stories and other goodies that you’ve earned as rewards. Thank you all.

WILD CYBERS: Third stretch goal met! Two days left!

And that’s three! The Epic Science Fiction Adventures Kickstarter campaign has just surpassed $1800 in pledges, unlocking the third stretch goal. Backers at $5 and up will now get a digital copy of Danielle Ackley-McPhail’s story “Forest of a Thousand Lost Souls” in addition to my “Abductive Reasoning” and Robert Waters’s “Los Gatos,” along with Among the Wild Cybers, Shattered Dreams, and whatever other goodies come at their pledge levels.

As of this writing, there are now fewer than 55 hours left in the campaign, which ends at 10:14 PM EDT on May 30, 2018. If we can somehow manage to get another $300 in pledges by that time, reaching the $2100 level, it will unlock a digital copy of a whole novel, Issue in Doubt by David Sherman. It seems like a lot, but we got over $200 pledged overnight after the second goal was unlocked, so maybe we can make it. But time is running out!

Things are starting to look up

I can’t believe it’s only been three and a half weeks since I put out my desperate plea for donations and was worried whether I’d be able to pay my rent for the month. My fortunes have finally begun to improve since then. The generous donations I received from you, my readers, helped a lot, but in addition, just today I finally got approvals for a couple more Star Trek Adventures role-playing game campaigns I wrote a little while back. And since Modiphius pays very promptly, I should see the money in the bank within a matter of days, which means I should be able to pay my remaining bills for the month on time, and be in a fairly good position for next month.

I’ve even decided to keep my bicycle after all. Now that my situation’s a bit less desperate, I figure the limited amount of money I could get for it wouldn’t be worth the sacrifice. (I’m lucky, then, that nobody was willing to meet my offered price.) I could still stand to make more money if I can, but I feel I have other options now, ones that wouldn’t require giving up so much. And now that I’ve come close to losing my bike, I’m not taking it so much for granted, and I’m starting to feel I should try to get more use out of it again. I could definitely use the exercise.

Meanwhile, I’ve now mailed off all the autographed books that some of you ordered from me the other week. Sorry it took so long, but you should all get your books soon-ish. Of course, I’m always willing to sell more.

Also, there’s still the ongoing Kickstarter campaign for Among the Wild Cybers, now with just 5 days to go and just $77 short of unlocking its third stretch goal. At this point, it looks like the advance I’ll be getting from it will be fairly modest, but who knows? The other day, the pledge tally jumped by over $200 literally overnight, though it’s only gained another dollar in the 2 days since. So it’s impossible to say where it’ll end up at this point. I’m hoping that a lot of people save their pledges for the last day or two of a campaign. But there’s not a lot of time left, folks, plus there are several pledge bonuses that are available only in limited quantities, including hardcover and audiobook copies of Only Superhuman. So if anyone’s been holding off for whatever reason, I recommend acting fast.

As for my situation beyond June… well, as I mentioned the other day, I’ve gotten some promising news on that front, but it’s nothing I can talk about yet. Things might still be financially tight for me a little while longer, depending on how long it takes for things to play out. But I’m now more confident that I’ll be able to make it through, barring emergencies. Although I also have to work pretty fast on a few projects over the next several weeks, and I should probably get back to work on the most urgent one. Still, that’s a better feeling than the borderline panic of just a few short weeks ago. It’s been a very eventful time since then, and it’s only the beginning. And I’m really grateful to my fans for your help in getting me through the roughest patch.

I finally saw THOR: RAGNAROK (spoiler review)

Well, it took quite a while, but I finally reached the top of the library’s hold list for Thor: Ragnarok. So now I’ve finally seen it, out of sequence (after Black Panther) because it took so long. (I almost got it a week sooner from a friend who was going to loan me his Blu-Ray, but it turned out I couldn’t get my inherited Blu-Ray player to produce a picture without connectors that my other equipment can’t handle.) Fortunately, there’s nothing in either Ragnarok or Black Panther that requires them to be seen in order. As long as I saw them both before Avengers: Infinity War, I’m good.

So what did I think of Thor: Ragnarok? Not much, really. It’s a moderately amusing bit of fluff, but is that really enough for a movie about the Norse Armageddon? A lot of really big stuff happens in this movie, numerous major character deaths and permanent changes in the Asgardian status quo, and none of it has any emotional weight because the director is more interested in the comedy. None of the characters really seem to feel anything very deeply; they just look distractedly upset for a moment and then get back to being wry and quippy.

In the original Thor, the conflict between the brothers Thor and Loki was the emotional core of the film. That same family conflict, also including Odin and Frigga, was the most notable part of the second film as well. But here, we have Thor battling the sister he never knew he had — indeed, the original bearer of Mjolnir — and the fact of that relationship has effectively zero impact on the story, beyond the plot mechanics of explaining how she was able to hold and destroy Mjolnir. It just lies there and nothing is really done with it from a character standpoint. Hela is just one more of the MCU’s long list of one-dimensional villains who are more obstacles than characters. Meanwhile, the entire character arc of her henchman Skurge — based on what I gather was a really powerful and beloved storyline in Walt Simonson’s classic Thor run — is conveyed almost completely through Karl Urban repeatedly looking sullen and conflicted. The fact that most of the established Asgardian characters are killed off as an afterthought also weakens the impact of the conquest of Asgard, since there’s nobody there whose point of view we can identify with for much of Hela’s invasion. (I’m just glad that Jaimie Alexander’s commitment to Blindspot spared Lady Sif from the cavalier carnage. Maybe she can still show up on Agents of SHIELD again sometime.)

Then you’ve got the whole Planet Hulk adaptation crammed in and overshadowing the storyline that the movie’s actually named for. Again, as an insubstantial bit of amusement, it was fine. Certainly it deserves credit for going whole hog on the Jack Kirby design sense more than any prior MCU movie (with Stan Lee’s costume being the most Kirbyesque thing ever). But honestly, I’ve never been a fan of Kirby’s artwork, and I find his designs garish and silly. And again, there’s not much substance to the plotline. Thor’s arc with Loki is one that should be quite effective on paper, but it’s directed and played with so little weight and so much snark that the poignancy isn’t there. Tessa Thompson’s Valkyrie (who isn’t really called Valkyrie, but is just a Valkyrie whose given name is unrevealed) has a lot of inner angst, but it’s only passingly addressed, rushed through like most of the serious and important stuff in this movie. And Mark Ruffalo is surprisingly disappointing as both Hulk and Bruce Banner. It’s good to hear Hulk speaking more than two words per movie at last, but Ruffalo’s voice isn’t really cut out for it, even electronically deepened. And as Banner, he seemed to be distracted and phoning in his part, the charisma and subtle emotion he brought in his previous appearances not in evidence.

I’ve heard a lot of praise for this movie, and I just don’t get it. Sure, it has its funny bits, which is fine as far as it goes. But a Marvel Cinematic Universe movie should go farther. The MCU’s films and some of its TV shows have plenty of humor, even outright comedy, but they also have emotional depth and sincerity and a real sense of stakes and danger. This movie only seemed to care about laid-back snark and put little effort into the rest. None of the characters really seemed to be more than mildly annoyed or disappointed about any of the huge, intense, tragic, dramatic stuff that happened, so it was hard for me as a viewer to care much about it either. It was an amusing way to pass 2 hours and a bit, but it provided no substance that lasted beyond the moment. It’s really quite dissatisfying after the fact. This is the way Asgard ends: not with a bang, but with a shrug.

WILD CYBERS: Second stretch goal met! “Abductive Reasoning” is unlocked!

We did it! The Epic Science Fiction Adventures campaign has just surpassed its $1500 stretch goal, which means that all Kickstarter backers at $5 and above will get an electronic copy (DRM-free) of my short story “Abductive Reasoning” along with Among the Wild Cybers, Bud Sparhawk’s Shattered Dreams, and whatever other goodies they’ve pledged for. Another short story by Robert Waters, “Los Gatos,” had previously been unlocked.

Note that we’ve dialed back our goals a bit, since there’s only a shade over a week left in the campaign. Before, the interval between successive stretch goals was $500, but now it’s been dropped to $300. That means that if we can get the pledges up to $1800, backers at $5-up will receive a digital copy of Danielle Ackley-McPhail’s short story “Forest of a Thousand Lost Souls” in addition to “Los Gatos” and “Abductive Reasoning.” If we can get up to $2100 in the week remaining, the next bonus is a full novel, David Sherman’s Issue in Doubt. And there are four more short stories to unlock up to $3300.

Can we make it to any more stretch goals in the 8 days remaining? Remember, folks, the more you pledge, the higher the monetary advances Bud Sparhawk and I get for our books, and the more benefits you and all your fellow backers receive in return.

“Hubpoint of No Return” annotations now available

Analog May/June 2018 coverSorry I’ve been late putting up the annotations for “Hubpoint of No Return.” I had them written some time ago (I try to make a habit of doing annotations at the same time I proofread the galley pages, since I sometimes notice things that need fixing in the process), but I couldn’t post them until I saw the finished issue and could get the right page numbers. Unfortunately, my author copies apparently got lost in the mail, and I didn’t get replacements until this afternoon.

Anyway, the annotations page (with full spoilers) is here:

“Hubpoint of No Return” Annotations

Looking through the contents page of the May/June Analog, I see I’ve got the only novelette-length story in the issue — the rest is a serial conclusion, a novella, and a bunch of short stories. That’s unusual. Anyway, looks like I’ve got a bunch of stories to read now.

Yes, I’m going to Shore Leave this year

My second piece of writing news today: I can now confirm that I will be attending Shore Leave in Hunt Valley, Maryland as usual this year. The SF/fantasy convention will be held from July 6-8, 2018 at its usual venue, which is under new ownership yet again and is now called Delta Hotels Baltimore Hunt Valley.

https://www.shore-leave.com/

The plan is to debut Among the Wild Cybers at the convention, a process I’ll talk more about once I figure out just what it entails. This will be the first time I’ve debuted an original book at Shore Leave. I’m hoping there will be print copies of Hub Space available as well, but I’m not certain yet.

Hub Space cover

Oh, and there’ll be some actor guy named Shatner there too. I think I’ve seen him in one or two things…

There be WILD CYBERS here!

No, I’m not under attack by rogue robots — rather, my author copies of Among the Wild Cybers: Tales Beyond the Superhuman have just arrived.

Among the Wild Cybers in box

Among the Wild Cybers in stack

They’re thinner than I expected for a nearly 80,000-word book, but I guess that’s because of the trade-paperback format. But here they are, and it’s not much longer before the rest of you can get them too (Kickstarter backers first).

Here’s my brag shelf of all my original fiction to date, such as it is:

CLB brag shelf

Minus Hub Space, which I haven’t yet obtained a print copy of. But hey, the shelf is finally starting to grow a bit, and there’s a good chance that it’ll be growing more before long. For now, though, Only Superhuman and Among the Wild Cybers contain my complete published works to date in my primary original universe (plus “No Dominion”). So it’s nice to see them side by side. (I put ATWC first both for height reasons — I don’t want it between two shorter mass-market paperbacks — and because I generally shelve anthologies/collections before novels, a habit I picked up when I worked at the university library.)

And we’re now ridiculously close to unlocking “Abductive Reasoning” for Kickstarter backers — one to three more pledges should do it:

Only 11 days left!

My good deed for the day (with help)

I was just out for a walk at the local park, processing some good news I received yesterday and the extent to which it will improve my current financial situation (markedly but not completely, and I can’t say anything more yet). On my way out of the park, I noticed something anomalous about a young, recently planted tree, maybe close to twice my height. It and several others had those cylindrical wire-mesh cages around the trunks, the sort of thing that I guess are there to keep the flimsy saplings from blowing over or being knocked over or whatever. But someone had apparently lifted the wire cage up around its branches, and it was stuck there. It was probably someone’s drunken prank, judging from the beer bottle lying by the base of the tree. After a moment’s thought, I decided I couldn’t leave the poor tree in that condition, so I tried to see if I could work the cage free of the branches and lower it back down without hurting any of the branches too much. It proved tricky, though, with too many places where it was hooked in. I noticed that there was a seam in the cage where one end was hooked to the other, and I realized that if I could undo the hooks, I could unwrap the cage and then re-wrap it around the base.

But the cage was just a bit too high on the tree for me to reach the top hook, and I’d need to start at the top for best results. So I was on the verge of giving up when I noticed a jogger, apparently a college student from the bookstore logo on his sweatshirt, and asked him to give me a hand. I explained the situation and suggested that we could work together to unhook the seam, but he was convinced it would be simpler just to lift the whole thing up and over. So we gave that a try (after he threw away the beer bottle), and it turned out we were underestimating the height of the tree, or overestimating our own. We’d just made matters worse, making the whole thing more top-heavy and more likely to topple the tree.

At this point, I remembered that I’d seen some loose chairs in another part of the park, evidently left there by some recent visitors. So I hurried over to get one while the jogger held the cage up. Once I got back, he stood on the chair (my balance isn’t great these days — I got dizzy just looking up while trying to free the cage) and eventually managed to lift and rotate the cage free of the branches, with a little gentle bending of the upper portion of the tree on my part. Then it was just a matter of unhooking the freed cage and wrapping it back around the trunk where it belonged. I thanked the jogger, we talked a bit about our respective past experiences with other people’s tree vandalism, and we went our separate ways.

So this was our good deed for the day: straightening up someone else’s mesh.

Categories: Uncategorized

WILD CYBERS Kickstarter — two weeks left!

Time is running out, folks. There are now only two weeks left to pledge to the eSpec Books Epic Science Fiction Adventures Kickstarter for my Among the Wild Cybers story collection and Bud Sparhawk’s new novel Shattered Dreams. We’re now less than $120 short of the second stretch goal, which will unlock a DRM-free digital copy of my recent Analog short story “Abductive Reasoning” for all backers at the $5 level and above. Meanwhile, Bud Sparhawk has just provided two new special pledge levels: For a pledge of $50 or more, five lucky pledgers will receive print and digital copies of Shattered Dreams and a limited-edition Bud Sparhawk trading card, and for $70 or more, five pledgers will receive all of that plus a pair of uniform patches for military divisions within Bud’s fictional universe, I guess for cosplayers and the like.

And remember, there are still more bonus stories to be unlocked for every additional $500 pledged! Only two weeks to go!

Memory RNA after all?

Today I’m experiencing that common occupational hazard for the science fiction writer: Learning that a new scientific discovery has rendered something I wrote obsolete.

I’ll let Tamara Craig, the narrator of my 2010 story “No Dominion” from DayBreak Magazine, explain:

Nearly a century ago, an experiment with flatworms seemed to show that memory was stored in RNA and could be transferred from one organism to another. But the experiment had been an unrepeatable fluke — pardon the pun — and later research showed that memory worked in a completely different way, unfortunately for the science fiction writers who’d embraced memory RNA as a plot device.

(This passage is trimmed down a bit in the version soon to be reprinted in Among the Wild Cybers: Tales Beyond the Superhuman, since that collection’s editor thought the references to SF writers were a bit too meta and distracting.)

What I wrote there was based on memory and was roughly correct. In the late 1950s and early ’60s (“No Dominion” is set in 2059), a researcher named James V. McConnell spent years experimenting with memory in planaria (flatworms), doing things like cutting them up and testing if their regenerated tails retained the memories of their original heads, and — most famously — grinding them up and feeding them to other flatworms. McConnell’s research did seem to show that some learned behavior was passed on by what he proposed to be a form of RNA storing memories created in the flatworm’s brain. It’s true that there was never enough reliable confirmation of his result to establish it as true, and the scientific establishment dismissed McConnell’s findings, although they did inspire a lot of science fiction about RNA memory drips or memory pills as a technique for quick-learning overnight what would normally take months or years. However, it seems that there were some experiments that did appear to replicate the results. There just wasn’t enough consistency to make it definitive.

Apparently, there’s been some renewed experimentation with McConnell’s theory in the past few years, showing promising but uncertain results. What I read about today was a new result, involving snails rather than flatworms:

http://www.sfn.org/Press-Room/News-Release-Archives/2018/Memory-Transferred-Between-Snails

Memories can be transferred between organisms by extracting ribonucleic acid (RNA) from a trained animal and injecting it into an untrained animal, as demonstrated in a study of sea snails published in eNeuro. The research provides new clues in the search for the physical basis of memory.

Long-term memory is thought to be housed within modified connections between brain cells. Recent evidence, however, suggests an alternative explanation: Memory storage may involve changes in gene expression induced by non-coding RNAs.

A more thorough article about the result can be found at the BBC:

‘Memory transplant’ achieved in snails

Now, this doesn’t mean the original memory RNA idea was altogether right. This experiment involved injecting the RNA into the blood of the snails rather than feeding them ground-up snails. And the result probably needs to be repeated more times and studied more fully before it can be definitive. But it does suggest that I was wrong to insist that memory “worked in a completely different way.” It’s possible that memories are stored, not in patterns in the synapses of nerve cells, but in RNA in their nuclei, which has an epigenetic effect on the neurons’ gene expression and therefore their behavior and structure.

Of course, all these results show is that very simple reactions to stimuli can be transferred. There’s no evidence that it would work for something as elaborate as the kind of declarative memory and knowledge that the passage in the story was discussing, or the kind of procedural memory and skills often transferred by memory RNA in fiction (e.g. foreign languages or fighting techniques). Perhaps those kinds of memory are partly synaptic, partly epigenetic. Maybe there’s something else involved. So Tamara’s lines in the story may not be entirely obsolete, just a little inaccurate (forgivable, since she’s a cop, not a scientist).

So I guess it could be worse. It was a minor part of the story anyway. And the actual research itself suggests some interesting possibilities. The articles say that learning more about memory creation and storage — and perhaps memory modification and transfer — could help treat conditions like Alzheimer’s and PTSD. If so, then it’s unfortunate that McConnell’s results weren’t taken more seriously half a century ago.

WILD CYBERS — First stretch goal unlocked!

The Epic Science Fiction Adventures Kickstarter for Among the Wild Cybers (and Bud Sparhawk’s Shattered Dreams) has achieved its first stretch goal of $1200. This means that everyone who pledges $5 or above from this point on will get, in addition to the basic rewards for their pledge, a DRM-free digital copy of Robert Waters’s short story “Los Gatos.”

The next stretch goal reward is a DRM-free digital copy of my short story “Abductive Reasoning” from the Sept/Oct 2017 Analog. Once we reach $1500 in pledges, that story will be unlocked for everyone who pledges $5 and up. This is a nice bonus because it’s my one remaining uncollected story to date, other than the new “Hubpoint of No Return” in the current Analog (and the plan is to collect that along with its two sequels once all three have come out). So if and when we reach that goal, Kickstarter backers will have a more comprehensive and up-to-date collection of my short fiction than Among the Wild Cybers alone had room to provide.

Every additional $500 in pledges beyond that will unlock another short story by one of several authors, including “Forest of a Thousand Lost Souls” by my editor Danielle Ackley-McPhail (at the $2000 level) and “Stone-Cold Whodunit” from my pal Keith R.A. DeCandido’s Super City Police Department series (at the $4500 level). There are still a few bonuses left to reveal beyond that, possibly including something more from me.

So let’s get those pledges up there, folks! Tell your friends! Share and tweet and other social media things! The more pledges we get, the more everyone (well, $5-up) gets in return. Only 23 days left!

Thank you so much!

I want to give my deepest thanks to all the readers who made donations after my plea on Tuesday. Thanks to your exceptional generosity, I’m now confident that I’ll be able to pay my rent for another month, and most of my other bills as well. I’m not entirely out of the woods yet — and it turns out that my “good reason to believe” my writing situation would soon be improving is a bit less of a sure thing than I thought, or at least a bit more distant. Still, your donations have given me time, and enough relative peace of mind, to do my own part and continue looking for work. I’m deeply grateful, and I intend to give you all a shout-out in the acknowledgments of my next book, unless you let me know you’d rather stay anonymous. There may even be some characters named after you in some future book. It’s the least I owe you guys for being there for me when I needed you.

In the meantime, my book sale remains ongoing; consult the previous post for the list of books and the payment info.

To the person in Japan who ordered the copy of Only Superhuman: I still need to receive the international postage cost before I can send the book. I e-mailed you with the amount on Thursday, so please get back to me soon.

Meanwhile, folks, please share the word about the Among the Wild Cybers Kickstarter with anyone you can think of who might be interested. The more pledges we get, the more goodies our backers get, and the more it helps me pay my bills for next month, if not this one. The Kickstarter will remain open until May 30.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/e-specbooks/epic-science-fiction-adventures?ref=card

 

 

Good news and bad news

The good news is, the Kickstarter for Among the Wild Cybers (and Bud Sparhawk’s Shattered Dreams) has already surpassed its minimum funding goal in less than a week. Now comes the pursuit of the stretch goals, which will unlock a number of exciting benefits for the patrons who donate — and will also help me and Bud get monetary advances for our books, so that would be great.

Meanwhile, I have good reason to believe that my work situation is finally going to start improving significantly within the next few months, though I can’t say anything more about that yet.

 

The bad news is that, though I can now see the light at the end of the tunnel, I don’t have quite enough fuel to make it there. I’m flat broke, folks, more so than I realized I was until I checked my bank balances this morning. All the good things on the horizon are still too far away to help me with my immediate financial crisis. At the moment, I don’t have enough to pay the next month’s rent and other critical bills. I’m doing what I can to remedy that. I’m looking for jobs, I’m submitting stories, I’m even trying to sell my bicycle that I hardly ever ride anymore. But I can’t be sure I’ll make enough money in time, so I need to ask for any donations my readers are willing to give. I know this has become a familiar refrain from me lately, but it’s never been more urgent. It’s incredibly frustrating that my career slowdown has gone on this long, that so many things I’d expected to pay off by now have been delayed this long. Now they’re finally on the verge of paying off, but just a month or so too late. It’s ironic and scary to see myself so close to the finish line but not know how I’m going to make it the last few steps. I really hope you, my readers, can dig deep and help me out one more time. It doesn’t have to be much. My activity stats show I tend to get around 200 hits on this site per day. If every one of you donated just $4-5 each, it could be enough.

If nothing else, I still have a number of autographed books available for purchase. Here’s the current list of books I have available, their quantities (updated 10/4/18), and the price per copy (in US dollars):

Mass-market paperbacks: $8

  • Star Trek: TOS — The Face of the Unknown (5 2 copies)
  • ST: Enterprise — Rise of the Federation: Tower of Babel (4 copies)
  • ST: ENT — Rise of the Federation: Uncertain Logic (5 copies)
  • ST: ENT — Rise of the Federation: Live by the Code (5 4 copies)
  • ST: ENT — Rise of the Federation: Patterns of Interference (9 7 copies)
  • ST: Department of Temporal Investigations — Forgotten History (1 copy)
  • ST: Ex Machina (1 copy)
  • ST: TNG: The Buried Age (1 copy)
  • ST:TNG: Greater Than the Sum (1 copy)
  • ST: Titan: Over a Torrent Sea (1 copy)

Hardcovers: $20 (20% off!)

  • Only Superhuman (21 copies)

Trade paperbacks: $16

  • Star Trek: Mirror Universe — Shards and Shadows (6 copies)
  • ST: Myriad Universes — Infinity’s Prism (2 copies)
  • ST: Mere Anarchy (2 copies)
  • ST: The Next Generation — The Sky’s the Limit (2 copies)

Trade paperbacks: $14

  • ST: Deep Space Nine — Prophecy and Change (1 copy)
  • ST: Voyager — Distant Shores (2 1 copy)

I’ll try to keep this list updated with regard to availability, but if you have doubts (particularly with the single copies), query first. For buyers in the US, add $2.50 postage per book for MMPBs, or $4.00 postage for trades/hardcovers.  For buyers outside the US, pay the book price and I’ll bill you for postage separately once I determine the amount.

If you have a PayPal account of your own, please pay through that instead of a credit card.  PayPal charges a fee for credit card use, so if you do use a credit card, I have to ask for an additional $0.25 per mass-market paperback or an additional $0.50 per trade paperback or hardcover.

Please share this post and spread the word, both for the Kickstarter and for my book sale and call for donations.

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