Home > My Fiction, Star Trek > Looking back on 2018

Looking back on 2018

Last year at this time, when I made a post looking back on the year just ending, it was merely to talk about how I hadn’t announced any new writing projects that year, even though I had several things lined up that I was able to announce soon thereafter. In a number of ways, 2018 was a good year for me career-wise. Right at the start of the year, I got to announce my Among the Wild Cybers story collection (including the brand-new “Aspiring to be Angels,” the first Emerald Blair story since Only Superhuman), which came out in August and quickly became one of eSpec Books’ top sellers for 2018. Later, I was able to announce that I was writing for the Star Trek Adventures role-playing game, and my first campaign for them was published last month, though I still have four more coming. (Indeed, the fifth was one I initially missed out on due to a lost e-mail, but then got to write after all when a filled slot reopened.) I sold a new trilogy of Hub stories, which all came out in Analog this year. Pocket’s Star Trek license was finally renewed, and I was hired to write Star Trek: The Original Series — The Captain’s Oath for spring 2019. I sold my first-ever fantasy story, “The Melody Lingers” (which should be published in Galaxy’s Edge sometime in 2019), and I got invited to contribute my first-ever story to a non-Star Trek anthology, eSpec’s Footprints in the Stars; said story has been written and submitted and I hope to say more soon. I even got in a bit of copyediting work, which hardly pays anything but should hopefully open the door for more such work in the future.

Despite all that, though, it’s been an extremely stressful year for me. Due to multiple writing projects being delayed by a great deal all at once in 2017 into 2018, I ended up in a deep financial hole and would’ve been in real trouble if not for some very generous donations from my fans, as well as a few family members. I had little luck finding other work, and it left me very anxious and depressed. When The Captain’s Oath finally came through, my depression made it hard for me to focus on my work, which exacerbated the tight deadline pressure I was under. So writing that book was a struggle. Even once I met my deadline and got paid, it proved difficult to shake off my anxiety, especially since I had to contend with jury duty late last month (which turned out to be far more harmless than I feared, but it was that fear that made it rough to get through), and then try to get past my writer’s block on a new story in time to submit it to an open-call anthology whose deadline was the end of the year. (Wow, just reminding myself of all that is giving me a headache.) I’ve been nervous about my money situation for 2019 and whether I’d be able to line up new work in time. I’ve also been dealing with intermittent hip pain (probably the early stages of arthritis) and a resurgence of my heartburn/indigestion issues, which are both an effect and a contributing cause of my stress.

But suddenly, this past week, a number of things have gone my way. I broke through my writer’s block and finished the new story, which has now been submitted. I’m kind of excited about it; the theme for the anthology led me to dredge up some story notes for a project I came up with many years ago and never got around to writing, and now I realize I’ve basically got a rough outline for what, with a little tweaking, could be a novel trilogy in a whole new fictional universe. Also, I’ve nearly finished the copyedits for The Captain’s Oath, which went pretty smoothly (though I still want to do one more editing pass through the manuscript before I turn it in). With all that stuff cleared off my list, I’m finally free to focus on developing one or two writing projects I’ve been meaning to get around to all year, so I’m looking forward to that. Best of all, though, I finally sold a novelette I’ve been waiting for an answer on for most of the year and had all but given up on. Getting that sale was the happiest moment of the year for me, a breakthrough in a few ways, and I should be able to say more about it in a few weeks, probably.

So I found myself spending a lot of the day yesterday just feeling content. Not overjoyed or euphoric (though there was a bit of that after I got the acceptance on that story a few days ago) — just a feeling of relaxation and inner quiet, a sense of ease and peace that I haven’t felt in a long time. It was refreshing just to sit still in the quiet of my bedroom and feel comfortable inside my own head.

A lot of that came from thinking about what’s coming up for me in 2019. Things are already looking promising there. Aside from The Captain’s Oath, I’ve got “The Melody Lingers,” my Footprints in the Stars story, the new thing I just sold, and one other thing (to be announced) already slated for next year, so I’ve already tied my personal record for the number of original (non-tie-in) works published in a single calendar year (four in 2010 and again in 2018). I’ve got several other submissions already pending, so if I sell even one more of them, it’s a new record. And I’ve still got time to write and sell more stuff that could be published by year’s end. So 2019 might well turn out to be my most prolific year for original fiction ever — indeed, with The Captain’s Oath and more Star Trek Adventures campaigns pending, it should be my most prolific year, period. I’m still not sure how financially secure I’ll be next year — most of the stuff currently slated to come out next year is stuff I’ve already been paid for, and I’m not yet sure what I might get next year in the way of royalties and new sales/contracts — but all that stuff coming out under my name in 2019 should be good for my long-term career prospects. Hopefully this year will be better for me income-wise than the last two, and hopefully it will lay the foundations for more career success later on.

(And just a reminder — you guys can help in that regard by posting reviews of my books and stories on Amazon, Goodreads, etc., and by liking my Facebook author page.)

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  1. December 30, 2018 at 4:29 pm

    David Wilson at Crossroad Press pays for proofing/copyediting work as they work on digitizing old works for ebook release. You might try him for extra income.

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