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Books starting to ship!

I’m pleased to report that, now that I have my bills paid up and my life starting to settle down, I’ve finally begun mailing out the books that you guys bought from me last month. Sorry it took so long, but I’m finally catching up. Today I sent out more than half the orders; what remains are my overseas orders and the order for the guy who bought one of everything. Those will take a bit more work to get done, but hopefully I’ll get those out within the next day or two.

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Checking in, belatedly

Hi, folks. I just realized I’ve been neglecting the blog again. I’ve been working on an original fiction project the past couple of weeks, something I’ve been wanting to write for a long time now and finally had a window to get started on, and it’s been taking up a lot of my attention. I don’t want to go into specifics yet, but it’s a return to a familiar setting in a new way.

Anyway, to those of you who’ve made donations and book orders in response to my last post, thank you very much. You’ve been extremely generous once again, and your contributions have helped me pay a slightly overdue health insurance bill and stay afloat for the month. Luckily, I’ve had a new book contract come in recently and will hopefully be seeing a substantial advance check any day now, but just in case it’s a bit late, your generosity has ensured I’ll be able to cover my rent for next month.

Indeed, I don’t think I’ve ever sold so many books in one sale, though that’s largely thanks to one person who ordered one of everything. I’ve run out of a lot of my stock — I still have 19 copies of Only Superhuman, but only one left of Among the Wild Cybers, and in Star Trek I’ve only got a few copies left of Rise of the Federation Books 2-5, five copies of Mirror Universe: Shards and Shadows, and one each of Mere Anarchy and The Sky’s the Limit. See the previous post for the updated list and ordering instructions if anyone’s still interested.

As for shipping, don’t worry, I’ll begin mailing out the books once I get my advance check, which hopefully will be within the week. And I’m keeping a list of the Tuckerization requests, of course. Surprisingly, only one of you has asked to be killed off horribly in the book. Well, maybe you know that’s more up David Mack’s alley than mine.

Let’s see, what else has been going on with me? Nothing great, I’m afraid. I’ve been dealing with a persistent throat irritation of some sort that feels at its worst like something’s stuck in my throat or choking me, which is pretty nasty. (My breathing is unaffected, though.) The doctor thought it was from sinus irritation and prescribed something that didn’t help. I eventually figured out that the best thing to relieve it was deep breathing and focusing on relaxing the throat and neck area, so I suspect it’s mainly an anxiety symptom — probably an initially mild irritation that I made worse by repeatedly clenching my throat in response to it and by being mentally preoccupied with the discomfort. (Even writing about it right now is making my throat uncomfortable. I’m so suggestible.) Relaxation exercises have been the one pretty reliable way to ease the symptoms. But it still hasn’t entirely gone away, and I’m still not sure what might trigger a recurrence; some of the things I’ve thought were causative factors turned out not to be correlated with it at all. (I thought coffee, orange juice, and acidic foods might be doing it, but fortunately they don’t seem to have been.) I think it’s become closer to the exception than the norm, at least, and it’s usually milder and shorter-lived when it does happen.

I also learned last week that someone I knew had passed away suddenly — Frank Johnson, who hosted the same WGUC-FM afternoon radio show that my father hosted for most of his career, and whom I was casually friendly with through occasional social gatherings in recent years. I didn’t know him that well, but he was a nice guy and I felt sort of a connection through my father (we were both inheritors of his in a way) and through WGUC. And I didn’t even know he was battling cancer; apparently he was very private about it. So this came as unexpected news. My condolences to his family and close friends.

There’s also a good news/bad news situation where I’ve nominally sold a story I’ve been trying to sell for a while, yet there’s a surprising delay in seeing the actual contract. Although that’s less worrisome than it was because that much bigger contract has come through, so there’s no longer a rush. Still, I hope that gets resolved soon so I can talk about it. I have a couple of other major original projects that are close to landing as well, but they’re also unexpectedly delayed. Everything in publishing seems to be moving so slowly these last few years, at least for me.

Well, I’ll feel better once that check comes in and my financial worries diminish (at least for now). Then I’ll finally be able to see Captain Marvel and maybe one or two other movies, get out into the world more again. Plus it’s spring now, so the weather will be improving and I can get more outdoor exercise. Although I won’t have too much time for that, since I’ll be very busy writing that new book.

Two million words!

February 15, 2019 2 comments

It’s time to do another one of my overview posts of the word count of my published works, since it’s been nearly three years since the last one and I’ve gained a significant number of original published works in the interim. Plus, as you can tell from the title, I’ve just achieved another milestone! With the recent release of my second Star Trek Adventures game campaign The Gravity of the Crime, I have now surpassed 2 million words of paid, published fiction!

The list below includes all my paid fiction that has been published as of February 2019, plus two upcoming releases that have already been copyedited so that I have final word counts, namely Crimes of the Hub and Star Trek: The Original Series — The Captain’s Oath. It excludes the sold stories “The Melody Lingers” (Galaxy’s Edge magazine) and “The Stuff That Dreams Are Made Of” (the Footprints in the Stars anthology) because they haven’t been copyedited yet, but they should be around 4400 and 5000 words, respectively. There’s another story for which I’m currently waiting for a contract and copyedits, so I may update this list once that or the others come together. I’ve left out the unpaid essays I’ve contributed to various sites, since it’s hard to keep track of them all, and I do so much unsolicited blathering online as it is.

ORIGINAL FICTION

Default/”Only Superhuman” universe:

Novels:

  • Only Superhuman: 118,000 words

Stories:

  • “Aggravated Vehicular Genocide” (revised): 12,100
  • “Among the Wild Cybers of Cybele”: 9400
  • “The Weight of Silence”: 7600
  •  “The Caress of a Butterfly’s Wing”: 8900
  •  “Murder on the Cislunar Railroad”: 8200
  • “Twilight’s Captives”: 10500
  • “Aspiring to Be Angels”: 7900

Total story count: 64,600 words

Additional material:

  • Among the Wild Cybers Historical Overview, Glossary, and Afterword: 6500

Total default universe: 189,100 words

Hub universe:

  • “The Hub of the Matter”: 9300
  •  “Home is Where the Hub Is”: 9800
  •  “Make Hub, Not War”: 9800
  •  Hub Space: Tales from the Greater Galaxy: 33,300 (preceding stories + 4400 words new material)
  • “Hubpoint of No Return”: 12,400
  • “…And He Built a Crooked Hub”: 12,500
  • “Hubstitute Creatures”: 14,200
  • Crimes of the Hub: 45,600 (preceding stories + 6500 words new material)

Total: 78,900 words

Other:

  •  “No Dominion”: 7900
  • “Abductive Reasoning”: 4100

Total: 12,000 words

Total original fiction count:  280,000 words

MARVEL FICTION

  • X-Men: Watchers on the Walls: 83,500
  • Spider-Man: Drowned in Thunder: 71,000

Total Marvel novel count: 154,500 words

STAR TREK FICTION

Novels:

  • Ex Machina: 110,000
  • Orion’s Hounds: 105,000
  • The Buried Age: 132,000
  • Places of Exile: 55,000
  • Greater Than the Sum: 78,500
  • Over a Torrent Sea: 89,000
  •  Watching the Clock: 125,000
  • Forgotten History: 85,500
  • A Choice of Futures: 81,000
  • Tower of Babel: 84,000
  • Uncertain Logic: 109,000
  • Live by the Code: 106,000
  • The Face of the Unknown: 95,000
  • Patterns of Interference: 85,500
  • The Captain’s Oath: 106,000

Total ST novel count: 1,446,500 words

Novellas:

  • Aftermath: 26,000
  • Mere Anarchy: The Darkness Drops Again: 28,900
  • Typhon Pact: The Struggle Within: 25,400
  • The Collectors: 35,400
  • Time Lock: 26,500
  • Shield of the Gods: 28,700

Total: 170,900

Novelettes:

  • “…Lov’d I Not Honor More “: 12,000
  • “Brief Candle”: 9800
  • “As Others See Us”: 9100
  • “Friends With the Sparrows”: 10,300
  • “Empathy”: 11,000

Total: 52,200

Total ST short fiction count: 223,100 words

Star Trek Adventures RPG campaigns:

  • “Call Back Yesterday”: 8200
  • “The Gravity of the Crime”: 10,500

Total ST RPG count: 18,700

Total ST fiction count: 1,688,300 words

STAR TREK MAGAZINE ARTICLES

  •  “Points of Contention”: 1040
  •  “Catsuits are Irrelevant”: 1250
  • “Top 10 Villains #8: Shinzon”: 820
  • “Almost a Completely New Enterprise”: 800
  • “The Remaking of Star Trek“: 1350
  • “Vulcan Special: T’Pau”: 910
  • “The Ultimate Guide: Voyager Season 3″: 1170 (not counting episode guide)
  • “Star Trek 45s #11: Concerning Flight”: 1000

Total article count: about 8350 words

All told:

  •  Novels: 1,719,000 words
  • Short fiction: 385,100 words
  • RPG campaigns: 18,700 words
  • Nonfiction: 8350 words

Total fiction: 2,122,800 words

Total overall: 2,131,150 words

 

(And just a reminder — if you enjoy any of my books, please post reviews of them on Amazon or other sites where books are sold. The more reviews they have, the more notice they can attract.)

More STAR TREK ADVENTURES coming this year (and one just released)!

February 9, 2019 1 comment

I just noticed this item on the TrekCore news site:

http://trekcore.com/blog/2019/02/star-trek-adventures-continues-to-expand-in-2019/

It’s an announcement of several new Star Trek Adventures publications slated for 2019 release, including a couple of new sourcebooks, but at the bottom, it mentions the August release of Strange New Worlds: Mission Compendium Vol. 2:

STA Strange New Worlds Mission Compendium

In August, Star Trek Adventures will begin to explore Strange New Worlds with its second mission compendium of the same name. The book will contain 10 original missions to play through, exploring the strangest and most challenging away missions on dangerous planets and weird environments.

Strange New Worlds follows These Are the Voyages in providing fans with adventure material for the game from both Star Trek fiction writers such as Christopher L. Bennett (The Captain’s Oath, Greater Than the Sum) and roleplay gaming luminaries like Jason Bulmahn (Pathfinder).

My contribution to this volume is the fifth adventure scenario I wrote, but it’ll be my first to be released in print instead of PDF form. At this point, only one of my PDF campaigns has been released, but hopefully more will come out in the 6 months before Strange New Worlds: Mission Compendium Vol. 2 comes out.

Hmm. Twenty years ago, I tried to break into Star Trek writing by submitting a few stories to another thing called Strange New Worlds, the annual contest anthology that Pocket ran for 10 years to discover new authors. As it happens, the first one I submitted to was the second volume of SNW. I never got into that SNW (although some of my Trek Lit colleagues got their starts there, including Dayton Ward and William Leisner), but now I finally get into another Trek collection of the same title, more or less.


EDIT: Thanks to Bernd in the comments, I now know that my second PDF game, The Gravity of the Crime, was released just two weeks ago:

https://www.modiphius.net/collections/star-trek-adventures/products/star-trek-adventures-the-gravity-of-the-crime-pdf

STA_The_Gravity_of_the_CrimeWill you violate the Prime Directive?

Welcome commander…  Your orders are go undercover on the pre-contact planet of Kalmur to investigate the accidental death of a Federation observer.

When a Kalmuri experiment into artificial gravity goes wildly wrong, an experimental device explodes crushing everyone within the test lab, including a Starfleet scientist, Lieutenant Li, who had infiltrated the project as an observer.

Sent to investigate this apparently accidental death, your team is confronted by a Kalmuri detective, Lanox, who is convinced the deaths are the result of sabotage.

Can you solve this classic locked-room murder mystery without violating Starfleet’s Prime Directive?

Set during the TNG era, this adventure also contains advice for adaptation to other eras including The Original Series.

STAR TREK: THE CAPTAIN’S OATH Cover Reveal!

January 13, 2019 4 comments

At last, the cover and blurb for Star Trek: The Original Series — The Captain’s Oath have been released!

Star Trek The Captain's Oath cover

Cover by Stephan Martiniere

The saga of James T. Kirk’s historic command of the U.S.S. Enterprise is known throughout the galaxy. But one part of the legend has barely been touched upon until now: the story of Kirk’s first starship command and the remarkable achievements by which Starfleet’s youngest captain earned the right to succeed Christopher Pike as the commander of the famous Enterprise. From his early battles with the Klingons to the rescue of endangered civilizations, Kirk grapples with difficult questions: Is he a warrior or a peacemaker? Should he obey regulations or trust his instincts? This thrilling novel illustrates the events and choices that would shape James T. Kirk into one of the most renowned captains in Starfleet history.

That’s right — once more, I’m filling in an unchronicled (or rarely chronicled) gap in Trek history. Indeed, I seem to have worked my way backward through Kirk-era milestones: the first mission post-TMP in Ex Machina, the end of the 5-year mission in Forgotten History, the transition between TOS and TAS in The Face of the Unknown, and now The Captain’s Oath covers both Kirk’s first starship command before the Enterprise (mentioned in The Making of Star Trek back in 1968 and alluded to in passing in the second TOS pilot) and, as a frame story, his first mission as captain of the Enterprise. Which means I’ll now have depicted both the beginning and end of the 5-year mission.

There have been a few previous versions of Kirk’s first mission on the Enterprise, but not very many, and not for a long time. The main ones were both more than 30 years ago — DC Comics’ first ST annual “All Those Years Ago…” by Mike W. Barr and Enterprise: The First Adventure by Vonda N. McIntyre. More recently, there’s been hardly anything — a few stories set near the start of Kirk’s ENT tenure (such as Mere Anarchy Book 1 and the flashback opening of IDW’s Mission’s End) and a brief flashback to the change of command in one of John Byrne’s IDW photo comics. And of course it was covered in David A. Goodman’s The Autobiography of James T. Kirk a few years ago. But I felt it was high time that the Pocket novel continuity got a new version of that first mission.

However, I was more interested in exploring Kirk’s previous command, which has hardly ever been explored in the tie-ins. A few stories have given brief glimpses of the beginning or end of Kirk’s first command — it was the Saladin in Mike Barr’s version, the Lydia Sutherland in McIntyre’s version, the Oxford in Howard Weinstein’s “Star-Crossed” in DC’s ST Volume 2, and the Hotspur in Goodman’s Autobiography. But it’s still largely a blank slate, so naturally I was drawn to it. Goodman’s book is the only one I’ve seen that shows any actual missions of that ship, though it only portrays a couple of them, mostly versions of events we already know from Kirk’s past, like the Dimorus incident mentioned in the second pilot. I was more interested in exploring things we didn’t already know about Kirk’s early career and how it shaped him into the captain we knew. This is a somewhat episodic novel covering several years, so it features a number of different missions and adventures of the fledgling Captain Kirk and his “forgotten” ship and crew.

Filling in the unexplored gap in a Star Trek captain’s career before the Enterprise is also something I’ve done before with Captain Picard in The Buried Age, which is why I’m pleased that that book’s cover artist, Stephan Martiniere, has returned to do this one as well. It’s a neat-looking cover that reminds me of the vintage Bantam Trek novel covers from the ’70s, with the Enterprise streaking past a vast, mysterious construct in space.

The Captain’s Oath will be released in trade paperback, e-book, and audiobook formats on May 28, 2019. Here’s the ordering link from Amazon — so far they’re the only site that’s uploaded the information as of this writing. But I’m told it’ll be showing up elsewhere quite soon.

Looking back on 2018

December 30, 2018 2 comments

Last year at this time, when I made a post looking back on the year just ending, it was merely to talk about how I hadn’t announced any new writing projects that year, even though I had several things lined up that I was able to announce soon thereafter. In a number of ways, 2018 was a good year for me career-wise. Right at the start of the year, I got to announce my Among the Wild Cybers story collection (including the brand-new “Aspiring to be Angels,” the first Emerald Blair story since Only Superhuman), which came out in August and quickly became one of eSpec Books’ top sellers for 2018. Later, I was able to announce that I was writing for the Star Trek Adventures role-playing game, and my first campaign for them was published last month, though I still have four more coming. (Indeed, the fifth was one I initially missed out on due to a lost e-mail, but then got to write after all when a filled slot reopened.) I sold a new trilogy of Hub stories, which all came out in Analog this year. Pocket’s Star Trek license was finally renewed, and I was hired to write Star Trek: The Original Series — The Captain’s Oath for spring 2019. I sold my first-ever fantasy story, “The Melody Lingers” (which should be published in Galaxy’s Edge sometime in 2019), and I got invited to contribute my first-ever story to a non-Star Trek anthology, eSpec’s Footprints in the Stars; said story has been written and submitted and I hope to say more soon. I even got in a bit of copyediting work, which hardly pays anything but should hopefully open the door for more such work in the future.

Despite all that, though, it’s been an extremely stressful year for me. Due to multiple writing projects being delayed by a great deal all at once in 2017 into 2018, I ended up in a deep financial hole and would’ve been in real trouble if not for some very generous donations from my fans, as well as a few family members. I had little luck finding other work, and it left me very anxious and depressed. When The Captain’s Oath finally came through, my depression made it hard for me to focus on my work, which exacerbated the tight deadline pressure I was under. So writing that book was a struggle. Even once I met my deadline and got paid, it proved difficult to shake off my anxiety, especially since I had to contend with jury duty late last month (which turned out to be far more harmless than I feared, but it was that fear that made it rough to get through), and then try to get past my writer’s block on a new story in time to submit it to an open-call anthology whose deadline was the end of the year. (Wow, just reminding myself of all that is giving me a headache.) I’ve been nervous about my money situation for 2019 and whether I’d be able to line up new work in time. I’ve also been dealing with intermittent hip pain (probably the early stages of arthritis) and a resurgence of my heartburn/indigestion issues, which are both an effect and a contributing cause of my stress.

But suddenly, this past week, a number of things have gone my way. I broke through my writer’s block and finished the new story, which has now been submitted. I’m kind of excited about it; the theme for the anthology led me to dredge up some story notes for a project I came up with many years ago and never got around to writing, and now I realize I’ve basically got a rough outline for what, with a little tweaking, could be a novel trilogy in a whole new fictional universe. Also, I’ve nearly finished the copyedits for The Captain’s Oath, which went pretty smoothly (though I still want to do one more editing pass through the manuscript before I turn it in). With all that stuff cleared off my list, I’m finally free to focus on developing one or two writing projects I’ve been meaning to get around to all year, so I’m looking forward to that. Best of all, though, I finally sold a novelette I’ve been waiting for an answer on for most of the year and had all but given up on. Getting that sale was the happiest moment of the year for me, a breakthrough in a few ways, and I should be able to say more about it in a few weeks, probably.

So I found myself spending a lot of the day yesterday just feeling content. Not overjoyed or euphoric (though there was a bit of that after I got the acceptance on that story a few days ago) — just a feeling of relaxation and inner quiet, a sense of ease and peace that I haven’t felt in a long time. It was refreshing just to sit still in the quiet of my bedroom and feel comfortable inside my own head.

A lot of that came from thinking about what’s coming up for me in 2019. Things are already looking promising there. Aside from The Captain’s Oath, I’ve got “The Melody Lingers,” my Footprints in the Stars story, the new thing I just sold, and one other thing (to be announced) already slated for next year, so I’ve already tied my personal record for the number of original (non-tie-in) works published in a single calendar year (four in 2010 and again in 2018). I’ve got several other submissions already pending, so if I sell even one more of them, it’s a new record. And I’ve still got time to write and sell more stuff that could be published by year’s end. So 2019 might well turn out to be my most prolific year for original fiction ever — indeed, with The Captain’s Oath and more Star Trek Adventures campaigns pending, it should be my most prolific year, period. I’m still not sure how financially secure I’ll be next year — most of the stuff currently slated to come out next year is stuff I’ve already been paid for, and I’m not yet sure what I might get next year in the way of royalties and new sales/contracts — but all that stuff coming out under my name in 2019 should be good for my long-term career prospects. Hopefully this year will be better for me income-wise than the last two, and hopefully it will lay the foundations for more career success later on.

(And just a reminder — you guys can help in that regard by posting reviews of my books and stories on Amazon, Goodreads, etc., and by liking my Facebook author page.)

I, not quite the jury

December 5, 2018 2 comments

I mentioned a couple of months ago that I got a summons for jury duty while I was busy writing Star Trek: The Captain’s Oath, so I managed to get it postponed for a couple of months — meaning until last Monday.

I went in hoping it would go like my first jury service nearly a decade ago, which I actually kind of enjoyed. That time, I was only called in for Monday to Wednesday the first week and just Wednesday the second week, and the one time I got called up for a trial, it was right before lunch and the parties settled during the break, so I never actually got inside a courtroom. (This is apparently very common — often, just the threat of a jury trial is enough to get someone to settle or plead out, so just being on call in the jury pool is all we need to do.) The rest of the time, I just sat around in the jurors’ lounge waiting to be called if needed. I was literally paid just to show up. And I was working on a rewrite of Only Superhuman at the time, so getting to spend a few hours a day in a quiet study lounge with a workspace for my laptop was perfect for my needs. That time, I found the experience so positive that I occasionally wondered if I could volunteer for another tour rather than having to wait to be summoned.

But this time was different. Given all the stress and anxiety I’ve been dealing with this past year thanks to my financial woes, I didn’t know how well I’d cope emotionally if I got assigned to be a juror on any kind of a serious or challenging case. Also, in recent years I’ve grown increasingly concerned about the racial injustice, police violence, and political corruption in America’s institutions, so I have less faith in the justice system than I used to. So this time around, I was very nervous about the whole thing. I spent the whole time on edge, afraid of having my name called.

It didn’t help that the daily stipend for being a juror is still exactly the same amount that it was nearly 10 years ago. I’d expected it to have increased by now. And I made the mistake of driving there on my first day, and I didn’t realize that my preferred downtown garage had raised its rates, so that parking alone ate up nearly 1/3 of my first day’s stipend. (The validated parking lots near the courthouse would’ve cost just as much, as it turned out.) I took the bus down after that, which meant walking several blocks in frigid weather.

Anyway, my first week did turn out to be uncannily similar to my first week 9 1/2 years ago. I showed up Monday morning and got the whole orientation speech, but I wasn’t called for a jury until Wednesday just before lunch (I got a hot dog from the courthouse convenience store, and it was pretty bad), and when I got back, we were kept waiting for more than an additional hour; then it finally turned out that the defendant had taken a plea, and since we’d been kept so late, we were released for the rest of the week. I was quite relieved that things had played out so much like they did the first time. (Oh, and we got free donuts Wednesday morning.)

The main difference is that I didn’t have a work in progress to rewrite this time. I’m between projects and was trying to come up with a plot idea for my next story, something I was able to do on Tuesday and Wednesday while riding the bus and walking the courthouse halls for exercise. (If you sign out for your 15-minute break and write “Walking” on the form, they cut you some slack if it takes longer than that to complete a mile, which is 7 laps around the corridors on the jurors’ floor.) Otherwise, I used the time to read the latest Analog issue, the one containing my story “Hubstitute Creatures.” I got it a couple of weeks ago, but I saved it for jury duty. There are some impressive stories in this one; I particularly liked “Pandora’s Pantry” by Stephen L. Burns, a robot-chef story that went in an unexpected and very satisfying direction, and “Learning the Ropes” by Tom Jolly, a story of interplanetary intrigue and tether propulsion in a setting that could almost be part of the historical backstory of Only Superhuman. I finished the magazine in my first week, and on Wednesday after I was released, I went over to the downtown library and picked up some books so I’d have something to read over the weekend and on week 2. One was a collection of Will Elder-illustrated comics stories from EC Comics’s 1950s SF, horror, and humor anthologies; most of them weren’t great, but there were a couple of Ray Bradbury adaptations and a couple of impressive tales that were almost Twilight Zone-worthy. And some of the parody stories were nostalgic for me, since I remembered reading them in my father’s pile of old humor comics back in the day.

So anyway, I was hopeful that week 2 would recapitulate my first time as closely as week 1 did. And I did get Monday and Tuesday off, which was good, because over the weekend, I came down with a bug of some kind — the inevitable result of having spent three days surrounded by dozens of people in public places in winter. If the pattern had continued to match the first time, I’d be called in on Wednesday and that would be it. But of course, there was still the chance that I’d be called to another jury and all bets would be off.

So imagine my surprise and relief when I checked the website Tuesday afternoon and it said that, for jurors of my group number who’d started on November 26, “your service is now complete.” I wasn’t needed back again at all! I guess it must be a slow week for crime and lawsuits. Maybe it’s the weather. But I’m glad I didn’t have to lug myself to the bus stop while I was sick. And now I’ve done jury service twice in my life and have yet to see the inside of a courtroom.

Of course, I wouldn’t have minded making more than three days’ worth of money from this (especially since parking and bus fare ate up so much of it already), but another day or two wouldn’t have made much difference. Fortunately, my manuscript for The Captain’s Oath has now been approved, so I should be getting my final advance from that pretty soon. And now I have about a week and a half until the copyedits for that are due in, which I hope will be enough time to write that new short story I plotted last week. It’s for an open-call anthology whose submission deadline is the end of the month, so I’m cutting it pretty close. But at least I’m free to focus on it now.

So that’s my jury-duty story. Maybe you were hoping for something more exciting, but I’m quite glad it turned out to be so uneventful.