Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Uncertain Logic’

A couple more minor site updates

Two site fixes today. One: A poster alerted me that my Uncertain Logic Annotations page was displaying the table too wide in Chrome and cutting off part of the text, which I think was due to that page having a second table inside one of the table cells. I tried some formatting changes to fix it, and something I tried caused the table formatting to disappear altogether, so I just went with that and converted it to the non-table format I use for most of my short-fiction annotations.

Two: I updated my Bibliography with my past couple of Hub stories and Among the Wild Cybers. It was about a year out of date, but now it’s current again. I wasn’t sure how to enter both AtWC and “Aspiring to Be Angels,” the new story appearing only in AtWC, so I just went with the redundancy.

Meanwhile, updating my own bibliography reminded me to check my Internet Speculative Fiction Database page, and as I hoped, they’ve finally added my three online original stories now that they’ve finally appeared in print in AtWC. Although they list AtWC as their only catalogued publication with just a note that they were previously published elsewhere. It also lists Hub Space now, but lists it by its trade paperback publication date of 2018 rather than its original e-book release date of 2015. Odd that an online resource would fail to count online publications. Although the bibliography isn’t entirely complete, since it doesn’t include the Russian translations of my first two Hub stories in ESLI Magazine. Still, it’s finally complete as far as my English-language professional fiction goes, so that’s good.

Advertisements

Resurfacing at last

Hello, everyone — sorry I haven’t been posting lately, but I’ve been really wrapped up in trying to finish Rise of the Federation: Patterns of Interference. This was kind of a rough one, since there were delays getting the contract and approvals through, so I was late getting started and I had to work fast. Which proved difficult, since I was suffering from a vitamin D deficiency that I think was causing me some mild depression and making it hard to focus. So I’ve spent the last month striving to finish the book, which left little mental attention for other writing such as blogging (though I still posted on my bulletin boards regularly because I’m addicted to those). I’m afraid I’ve really been neglecting this blog, and I need to try to refocus on it.

So anyway, PoI is finally done, and we’re expediting the editing process to make up for lost time. It helps that it came out relatively short, about 83,000 words. I figured that, after the big epic 2-part saga of Uncertain Logic and Live by the Code, it was good to do a story that was a bit more intimate in scope. I was influenced by The Next Generation‘s “Family” and Enterprise‘s “Home.” Although that’s only part of the novel’s story. Basically, there’s one really big adventure plotline at the heart of the novel, and a number of more character-driven subplots around it. But there are some major events and changes to the status quo on both scales. So it’s a smaller story, but with big consequences.

Another thing that helped with the tight writing schedule was that I’ve once again managed to recycle a concept from one of my old, unsold original stories as a subplot in PoI. It’s actually a double-recycle of sorts, because I was going to use the premise as the basis for a second Star Trek: Corps of Engineers novella, but that series was cancelled before I got a contract for it. For this version, I kept some of the new worldbuilding ideas I was going to add in the CoE tale, but I’ve actually been able to incorporate a lot more of the original story’s plot and dialogue in this version than I would’ve been able to do there, albeit revised to fit the new characters and relationships. So that saved me some time — although not as much as it could have, since there was a pair of supporting characters that were originally just names spouting dialogue in the material I copied, and I didn’t really work out who they should be and what motivated them until the revision phase, so parts of that sequence got rewritten several times.

I even got to the point where I was afraid that the book would run short, so I was looking through my old unsold fiction (just about all writers have a ton of early stuff they never sold, while they were learning the trade), trying to find some short story or subplot that I could adapt as a story arc for some supporting character to meet my word count. But I couldn’t find anything that was both adaptable to the 22nd-century Trek universe and well enough written to be usable — at least, not from the stuff I could remember, and taking the time to re-read a bunch of old stuff to refresh my memory would’ve defeated the purpose of trying to speed up the process. Fortunately, I managed to come up with enough new material to do the job, and it naturally worked better to add material that grew from the story and characters I had, rather than trying to shoehorn in some unrelated story. As a matter of fact, when I finally reached the end of the novel in the first draft, I was still a little bit short of 80,000 words, and I’d already decided there was one more scene I needed to go back and put in earlier. I did that later the same day, and it put me over the limit, and it wasn’t until I finished it that I finally felt the rush of euphoria and satisfaction that came from finally being finished. Although it didn’t last long, since I still needed to clean up and tighten the draft before I turned it in.

So now I’m finally done with PoI, and I’m free to resume work on some original projects that I’ve had to put off. Currently, I’m starting to explore the possibility of putting together a collection of my original stories, though it’s too early to say whether that will happen. Once that’s done, I need to get back to work on some new stories I have on the back burner, one of which is unfinished. Hopefully I can make some real progress on those and one or two other things before my next Trek project comes along — although I hope that next Trek project comes fairly soon, because I still need to make a living. That’s the paradox — my Trek work is what lets me make enough of a living to pursue the other stuff, but it tends to take up a lot of time that I could be spending on the other stuff instead. Well, I shouldn’t complain — I actually got a lot of original writing done in 2016 while waiting for the go-ahead on PoI. But there was some of it that I didn’t quite get to finish before I had to throw myself fully into Trek writing. Of course, it wouldn’t be as much of a problem if I were better at time management and self-discipline. But I’ve been telling myself that for ages and it hasn’t helped much.

Let’s see, I don’t have much to talk about beyond writing, because I haven’t had much of a life otherwise lately. One bit of good news — the fancy new Kroger they’ve been building next to the university for the past year and a half is finally opening in just a few days, so I’ll finally be able to get groceries from somewhere within walking distance again (although I doubt I’ll try biking there, since I don’t think the adjacent intersection is very safe for biking). And it’s a much larger, more elaborate superstore than the old one in that location, or than the next-nearest one in Walnut Hills, which I never liked going to, and which is actually closing the night before the new one opens. Makes sense, in a way — the store is twice as big, so it’s taking the place of two adjacent ones. Meanwhile, the local co-op store that replaced the old IGA up by Burnet Woods opened last month — nearly a year later than originally touted — and it’s not bad, though not as suited for my needs as the new Kroger will be. I hope it does well, though, since it’s good to have both options. After a year and a half with no grocery stores in the neighborhood, there are now going to be two. (Well, not really — the co-op is about the same distance from me as the Walnut Hills Kroger, but it feels closer to me, probably because I’m more familiar with its neighborhood.)

Well, that’s about all I have to report for now, and it’s lunchtime. I’ll try not to wait so long before posting again.

On Sulu, diversity, and change (minor STAR TREK BEYOND spoilers)

Well, just days after I made a post assessing my own work for its gender/sexual inclusiveness, we get a noteworthy piece of news from the makers of the upcoming Star Trek Beyond: The movie will establish in passing that Sulu has a husband and a daughter. The daughter is most likely Demora, a character established in Star Trek Generations, but the news everyone’s reacting to is that Sulu is married to a man. This is not being treated as a big deal in the movie, but it’s made quite the ripple in popular culture. The makers of Star Trek have been making noises about LGBT inclusion for decades, but they’ve never followed through until now. We got a few indirect attempts, the boldest being DS9’s “Rejoined” and its then-controversial same-sex kiss between Jadzia Dax and her former husband who was now in a female host — and the weakest being TNG’s “The Outcast,” whose attempt at anti-discrimination allegory was undermined by its heteronormative casting and its tedious preachiness at the expense of entertainment value. But the producers claimed they couldn’t figure out an appropriate way to include or reveal a gay, lesbian, or bisexual main character without it being overly preachy or self-conscious or whatever.

Which always seemed disingenuous to me, because a lot of other contemporaneous storytellers had already found the right way to do it, which was just to do it and not make an issue of it — to simply acknowledge the fact that LGBTQ people are already part of everyday life and that their relationships are no different than anyone else’s. Just write characters having relationships the same way you always do, but occasionally make their partners their own sex. This is how I and other Star Trek novelists have been approaching it for nearly two decades, ever since two of the lead female cadets in Susan Wright’s 1998 novel The Best and the Brightest (nominally a Next Generation book, but focusing on an original group of Academy cadets) were subtly established as being in a relationship, and ever since Andy Mangels & Mike Martin’s Section 31: Rogue in 2001 showed the Star Trek: First Contact character Lt. Hawk (who had been rumored as being gay but wasn’t shown to be onscreen) in a relationship with a Trill man named Ranul Keru (now a regular in the Star Trek: Titan series). I’ve done the same thing myself in a number of my books — indeed, in the past couple of Rise of the Federation novels, I’ve mentioned in passing that Travis Mayweather experimented with sexual partners of both sexes in his teens, and I’ve confirmed that Dr. Phlox is bisexual (as John Billingsley always believed him to be). So I technically beat the filmmakers to the punch with “outing” a canonical series-lead character, but only in the books, so it wasn’t definitive and hardly anybody noticed.

Anyway, the point is that including LGBTQ characters is something you can easily do just by treating sexual diversity as a routine part of life, which is what it actually is. That’s worked fine for me, and for my Trek Lit colleagues who’ve done the same. And we’ve seen similar casual inclusion in plenty of other media franchises by this point (e.g. Doctor Who, the DC “Arrowverse,” and Person of Interest), so it’s been frustrating that Star Trek, which made its name by being on the cutting edge of diversity and inclusive casting, persistently fell so far behind the curve on this count. So I’m very pleased to see that that’s no longer the case.

Some have questioned whether it was appropriate to make Sulu gay rather than some other character. George Takei himself has notably objected to this, saying it twists Gene Roddenberry’s original intentions for the character. But a lot of other notable gay voices associated with Star Trek have lauded the change, including Zachary Quinto, David Gerrold, and Andy Mangels. I think Adam-Troy Castro’s take on Takei’s reaction is cogent — that it’s more about an actor’s attachment to his long-established mental model of the character he plays than anything else. (We’ve seen other actors, like Dirk Benedict and Adam West, react poorly to reimaginings of their iconic characters.) After all, Gene Roddenberry was not reluctant to change his intentions. He was the guy who altered the Klingons’ appearance for Star Trek: The Motion Picture and asked fans to assume they’d always looked that way. Creators change their minds after the fact all the time.

And I agree with Simon Pegg’s explanation that it was a better choice to establish this as one attribute of a known character, one we already had an investment in and an image of, than to introduce some new person who would just be there to be “the gay character” and would probably never be seen again after the one movie. It’s not really inclusion if you continue to keep the core cast uniform and just “include” token characters on the fringes. That’s why the Supergirl TV series making Jimmy Olsen black was a better choice than introducing some new minor character to be “the black guy.” The Superman comics tried that with Ron Troupe, and, well, if you’re asking “Ron who?”, then that makes my point for me.

Also, it can be argued that the Sulu of the Kelvin Timeline (I’m so pleased to have an official name for the new movies’ universe now) doesn’t need to have the same orientation as the Sulu of the Prime universe. The Star Trek Chronology conjecturally puts Sulu’s birth in 2237, four years after the timelines split. So even if he’s genetically the same individual (which he doesn’t necessarily have to be, since he could’ve been conceived at a different time, like how Chekov is four years older in this reality), the hormonal and epigenetic factors shaping his pre-natal development could’ve been different, giving him a different orientation — like several of the Leda clones on Orphan Black (Alison is hetero, Cosima is lesbian, Sarah is at least situationally bisexual, Tony is transgender, etc.).

Honestly, we don’t even know for sure that Prime Sulu was heterosexual. By happenstance (or more likely because of racial prejudices that still linger today), Sulu was the one member of the main cast who was never given a romantic subplot. Leila Kalomi in “This Side of Paradise” was going to be Sulu’s love interest (hence her “exotic” name), but was then rewritten to be Spock’s and cast as a blonde woman. He was shown to be affected by the allure of “Mudd’s Women” and “The Lorelei Signal” along with all the other men in the crew, and in the extended cut and novelization of ST:TMP, he’s flustered and aroused by Ilia’s Deltan sex appeal — but it’s worth noting that those were all superhumanly arousing women, so it doesn’t prove that ordinary women would get a rise out of him. A lot of people strongly prefer one sex but are capable of occasional interest in the other.

I don’t count Sulu’s “fair maiden” reaction to Uhura in “The Naked Time,” because he was role-playing as D’Artagnan. Nor do I count “Mirror, Mirror” Sulu’s harassment of Uhura, both because that was another alternate version and because sexual harassment is more about power than attraction. (For all we know, Mirror Sulu harassed Chekov the same way when the camera wasn’t looking.) So that just leaves the somewhat creepy moment in “The Magicks of Megas-tu” where Sulu used the alternate dimension’s “magical” physics to conjure up an illusory woman that he tried to kiss. On the bridge. In front of everybody. Honestly, that’s just wrong on so many levels that I’m happy to ignore it. (I disregard the whole episode anyway. It’s steeped in the Hoylean continuous-creation cosmology that had already been discredited in favor of the Big Bang even at the time, and is now as archaic as a story about canals on Mars or dinosaur-filled jungles on Venus.)

Honestly, when George Takei first came out publicly years ago and I heard people say “So should Sulu be gay now?” I thought he shouldn’t be, because the actor and the character are two different people, and gay actors shouldn’t be typecast as only playing gay characters. But of course, Sulu is now played by a different, heterosexual actor, so that ameliorates it somewhat. And I can see the logic that, since Sulu is the only character who never explicitly had a heterosexual relationship onscreen, he’s the most likely candidate, even aside from who played him. Indeed, David Gerrold commented recently that he always read Sulu as gay.

Things get trickier when you bring the tie-ins into it, because a number of books and comics have shown Sulu in heterosexual relationships, including with Mandala Flynn in Vonda McIntyre’s The Entropy Effect (the book that coined his first name Hikaru), Demora’s mother Susan Ling in Peter David’s The Captain’s Daughter, M’Ress and Kathy Li in Peter David’s DC comics, and a Tokugawa-era concubine in the time-travel novel Home is the Hunter by Dana Kramer-Rolls. True, the books and comics have never had a single, uniform continuity, and the only one of those stories that’s really compatible with the modern novel continuity is The Captain’s Daughter (which I referenced in Ex Machina and Watching the Clock, and which established the characterization of Enterprise-B captain John Harriman that David R. George III has expanded on in several later works). That one’s kind of tricky to get around, given its importance. Still, I expect Sulu’s newly established characterization in Beyond will be reflected in how future novelists write him. As has happened in the past, any inconsistencies will either be glossed over or explained away. After all, anything else would feel like moving backward.

2016 Ohioana reception

This past Sunday, I attended the annual Ohioana Library Association reception for local authors at the Cincinnati Public Library’s main branch. Here I am accepting my certificate for Rise of the Federation: Uncertain Logic from Ohioana Hamilton County Committee chairman David Siders:

DSC_0380

And that photo pretty much tells me it was a mistake to wear slacks without a jacket. Or maybe I need better-fitted slacks. My hips aren’t really that bulgy.

There was nominally an opportunity to sell some books here, so I brought a few paperbacks, but the sale didn’t seem as well-organized as last year, and I ended up instead spending the whole post-reception time talking with other honorees, local folks I’ve met at earlier book events and got to reconnect with here. So it was more satisfying socially than financially, but that’s fine. I’ll get a better chance to sell books at the same location on May 21st, when I attend the Cincinnati Library Comic Con.

LIVE BY THE CODE to debut at Cleveland ConCoction!

February 27, 2016 1 comment

We’re just under two weeks out from the Cleveland ConCoction convention at the Cleveland Sheraton Airport Hotel, at which I’ll be the author Guest of Honor, a first for me. And on the subject of firsts, I’m pleased to announce that my new Star Trek novel will be making its debut a few weeks early at the convention.

Live by the Code cover

Simon & Schuster has agreed to provide a limited number of copies of Star Trek: Enterprise — Rise of the Federation: Live by the Code (book 4 in the series), which I will sign and give away on a first come, first served basis. The book doesn’t officially go on sale until March 29, but the folks at S&S were kind enough to work with me and the convention staff to make this happen. There will also be a larger number of giveaway copies of books 2 & 3, Tower of Babel and Uncertain Logic, though unfortunately S&S doesn’t currently have book 1 in stock.

Tower of Babel cover ROTF Uncertain Logic cover

The plan is to split the supply into three lots so that there will be giveaway books available on all three days of the convention. But they’ll probably go pretty quickly, so if you plan to attend, I suggest you try to come early. I’ll endeavor (pun intended) to keep folks posted about my schedule.

While these three ROTF volumes will be given away, I also plan to have various books from my own reserves which will be for sale, including some older Trek novels, but mostly featuring hardcover copies of my original novel Only Superhuman. The last time I was at a comics-oriented convention, I was able to move a fair number of copies of OS, so I’m hoping the same will be true this time.

Only Superhuman by Christopher L. Bennett

I’ll also be on several panels over the course of the convention. The schedule can be found here. My own scheduled appearances include:

FRIDAY, MARCH 11

  • 5 PM, Orion Ballroom: Opening Ceremonies
  • 11 PM, Lyra Room: “My Favorite Heroines”: Panel about female protagonists in SF/fantasy.

SATURDAY, MARCH 12

  • 11 AM, Lyra Room: Author Showcase: Includes Q&A and a reading from one of my books (which means I’d better pick out a scene to read!)
  • Noon, Authors’ Alley: Autograph session following up the Showcase.
  • 3 PM, Pegasus Room: “Strange Stories About Coming Up with Characters”: Speaks for itself, I guess.
  • 8 PM, Lyra Room: “Shaping the Short Story”

SUNDAY, MARCH 13

  • 11 AM, Lyra Room: “Best Worlds in Sci-Fi”: Talking about the SF universes we love.
  • 2 PM, Orion Ballroom: Closing Ceremonies

I’ll also be available at my Guest of Honor table (ooh, I like saying that) in Authors’ Alley at various times throughout the weekend. I gather the other Guests of Honor (actors, musicians, gamers, cosplayers, etc.) will be gathered in their own area, but I feel that being with the other author guests will be a better fit, since that’s where the book fans will presumably be.

For more Pocket Books news, you can follow their Facebook fan page, and their Twitter address is @Pocket_Books.

Books by the Banks report

Well, as I hoped, Books by the Banks did cheer me up after my recent computer woes. The reception on Friday night was at the Mercantile Library downtown, a pretty classy place. It was heavily attended, making it an unusually noisy gathering for a library, but they had a free buffet which constituted my dinner and included some nice strawberries and cheese among other things. My nametag got me recognized by author Jeff Suess, who had a story in one of the Star Trek: Strange New Worlds volumes, and we talked Trek for a while. I later chatted with a few other authors I met for the first time. And I briefly touched base with noted children’s book author Sharon Draper, who won one of the awards given out at the reception, and who was my 8th-grade English teacher back at Walnut Hills High School decades ago. I was rather surprised that she remembered me, and she had some nice things to say about me. Honestly I don’t remember 8th grade all that well myself. It was a pretty rough time in my life, and I was kind of an emotional wreck and an underachiever. It’s reassuring that one of my teachers from that time came away with positive memories of me.

Anyway, I couldn’t resist staying up until midnight on Friday to watch the series finale of Continuum on Syfy (a bit rushed, but effective), and I woke up too early the next morning. Generally when I do that, I get up for a bit to let the sheets cool down, go back to bed, then eventually drift off and sleep fairly late. But this time, I had to force myself to get up early enough to get to the convention center by 10, and my morning coffee barely left me functional enough to drive. I practically sleepwalked into the convention center, or so it felt to me, but I bought another cup of coffee and it did the trick — or at least helped me kick into my convention/interview mode where I’m more outgoing and talkative than I usually am with strangers.

The energy of the crowd may have helped too. It was unusually lively and well-attended this year, and people weren’t afraid to spend money on books. The main book I was there to sell this year was Rise of the Federation: Uncertain Logic, but they had a few copies of ROTF: Tower of Babel as well, plus about five print-on-demand trade-paperback editions each of Only Superhuman and TNG: Greater Than the Sum, neither of which I’ve seen in TPB before. It wasn’t a very Trek-oriented crowd overall, and I didn’t make much of a dent in the big pile of Uncertain Logic copies, but I sold out of both Only Superhuman and Tower of Babel and was down to two copies of GTTS by the end of the day (even though the TPB edition of it was the most expensive item on my table). And since I earned out my advance on Only Superhuman earlier this year, that means I made myself a few more bucks in royalties yesterday, although I won’t see them for another 6 or 7 months.

I also got to see a couple more acquaintances, including Mark Perzel of Cincinnati Public Radio (who interviewed me about Only Superhuman a few years back), local author Dan Andriacco (whom I’ve met at the library’s Ohioana reception and last year’s BbtB), and R. S. Belcher, another Strange New Worlds author whom I’ve met at Shore Leave, as well as a fellow Tor author whose novels include The Six-Gun Tarot and The Shotgun Arcana. So I got to have some nice conversations with them and with other authors and readers over the course of the day. All in all, it was a successful event and I had a good time. Though I was really worn out once I got home. Hopefully I finally caught up on my sleep last night, though I think maybe I’m still a little out of it.

But I’m definitely glad I bought a new winter coat the week before last, after my old one’s zipper broke. The weather was still warm when I bought it, but temperatures have plunged over the past few days, so my timing was pretty good.

I’ll be at Books by the Banks Oct. 17!

Sorry for the late notice… After missing out on it last year, I’ll be a guest at the Books by the Banks festival again this year. The event will be on Saturday, Oct. 17 from 10 AM to 4 PM at the Duke Energy Convention Center in downtown Cincinnati, on 525 Elm Street. Here’s the directions page with parking information. My featured book at the festival will be Star Trek: Enterprise — Rise of the Federation: Uncertain Logic, but hopefully there will be copies of my older books available as well.