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My Shore Leave 38 schedule

The final schedule for Shore Leave 38 has gone online:

http://www.shore-leave.com/programming/schedule.htm

Here are the appearances and panels I have scheduled, assuming I survive what looks like a rainy drive tomorrow:

FRIDAY 7/15

Meet the Pros — 10 PM to Midnight, Hunt/Valley Corridor

The usual mass signing event. For a change this year, I intend to have copies of Only Superhuman and assorted Trek paperbacks for sale. I’m now equipped to take credit cards as well — I find I seem to be selling more books now that I have that option, so I though it would be worth mentioning.

SATURDAY 7/16

Kick-ass Women Heroes — Noon, Salon A

Pretty self-explanatory. Also with Rigel Ailur, Joshua Palmatier, T.J. Perkins, Greg Cox, Mary Fan, and Jo Graham.

Superhero TV Scorecard — 1 PM, Salon A

The writer guests geek out about, well, superhero TV. Also with Russ Colchamiro, Michael Jan Friedman, Dave Galanter, Susanna Reilly, and Daniel Patrick Corcoran.

World-Building — 2 PM, Chase Ballroom

Discussing one of my favorite subjects with Stephen Kozeniewski, Richard C. White, Michael Jan Friedman, Mary-
Louise Davie, Kelly Meding, Jim Johnson, and Peter David.

Star Trek at 50 — 3 PM, Salon A

Not to be confused with the “Star Trek: The Big 5-0” panel at 10 AM in the same room. That’s the fan-track anniversary panel, while this is the author track one (so you’d think we could’ve come up with a more distinctive name). I’ll be there with Robert Greenberger, Dave Galanter, Howard Weinstein, Paula M. Block, and Larry Nemecek, and I imagine some other folks will show up as well.

Upcoming Star Trek Books — 5 PM, Salon A

Discussing next year’s schedule with Greg Cox, Dayton Ward, David Mack, and Scott Pearson. Sadly, this is on at the same time as the “Air and Space Museum’s Enterprise Project” panel that I was dying to see.

SUNDAY 7/17

Original e-Books/e-Novellas — Noon, Concierge Lounge

Discussing original-to-electronic work with Jim Johnson, Terry J. Erdmann, Paula M. Block, Richard C. White, Steve Wilson, and Jo Graham.

So basically I’ll be in Salon A a lot on Saturday, with a lighter schedule on the other two days.

On Sulu, diversity, and change (minor STAR TREK BEYOND spoilers)

Well, just days after I made a post assessing my own work for its gender/sexual inclusiveness, we get a noteworthy piece of news from the makers of the upcoming Star Trek Beyond: The movie will establish in passing that Sulu has a husband and a daughter. The daughter is most likely Demora, a character established in Star Trek Generations, but the news everyone’s reacting to is that Sulu is married to a man. This is not being treated as a big deal in the movie, but it’s made quite the ripple in popular culture. The makers of Star Trek have been making noises about LGBT inclusion for decades, but they’ve never followed through until now. We got a few indirect attempts, the boldest being DS9’s “Rejoined” and its then-controversial same-sex kiss between Jadzia Dax and her former husband who was now in a female host — and the weakest being TNG’s “The Outcast,” whose attempt at anti-discrimination allegory was undermined by its heteronormative casting and its tedious preachiness at the expense of entertainment value. But the producers claimed they couldn’t figure out an appropriate way to include or reveal a gay, lesbian, or bisexual main character without it being overly preachy or self-conscious or whatever.

Which always seemed disingenuous to me, because a lot of other contemporaneous storytellers had already found the right way to do it, which was just to do it and not make an issue of it — to simply acknowledge the fact that LGBTQ people are already part of everyday life and that their relationships are no different than anyone else’s. Just write characters having relationships the same way you always do, but occasionally make their partners their own sex. This is how I and other Star Trek novelists have been approaching it for nearly two decades, ever since two of the lead female cadets in Susan Wright’s 1998 novel The Best and the Brightest (nominally a Next Generation book, but focusing on an original group of Academy cadets) were subtly established as being in a relationship, and ever since Andy Mangels & Mike Martin’s Section 31: Rogue in 2001 showed the Star Trek: First Contact character Lt. Hawk (who had been rumored as being gay but wasn’t shown to be onscreen) in a relationship with a Trill man named Ranul Keru (now a regular in the Star Trek: Titan series). I’ve done the same thing myself in a number of my books — indeed, in the past couple of Rise of the Federation novels, I’ve mentioned in passing that Travis Mayweather experimented with sexual partners of both sexes in his teens, and I’ve confirmed that Dr. Phlox is bisexual (as John Billingsley always believed him to be). So I technically beat the filmmakers to the punch with “outing” a canonical series-lead character, but only in the books, so it wasn’t definitive and hardly anybody noticed.

Anyway, the point is that including LGBTQ characters is something you can easily do just by treating sexual diversity as a routine part of life, which is what it actually is. That’s worked fine for me, and for my Trek Lit colleagues who’ve done the same. And we’ve seen similar casual inclusion in plenty of other media franchises by this point (e.g. Doctor Who, the DC “Arrowverse,” and Person of Interest), so it’s been frustrating that Star Trek, which made its name by being on the cutting edge of diversity and inclusive casting, persistently fell so far behind the curve on this count. So I’m very pleased to see that that’s no longer the case.

Some have questioned whether it was appropriate to make Sulu gay rather than some other character. George Takei himself has notably objected to this, saying it twists Gene Roddenberry’s original intentions for the character. But a lot of other notable gay voices associated with Star Trek have lauded the change, including Zachary Quinto, David Gerrold, and Andy Mangels. I think Adam-Troy Castro’s take on Takei’s reaction is cogent — that it’s more about an actor’s attachment to his long-established mental model of the character he plays than anything else. (We’ve seen other actors, like Dirk Benedict and Adam West, react poorly to reimaginings of their iconic characters.) After all, Gene Roddenberry was not reluctant to change his intentions. He was the guy who altered the Klingons’ appearance for Star Trek: The Motion Picture and asked fans to assume they’d always looked that way. Creators change their minds after the fact all the time.

And I agree with Simon Pegg’s explanation that it was a better choice to establish this as one attribute of a known character, one we already had an investment in and an image of, than to introduce some new person who would just be there to be “the gay character” and would probably never be seen again after the one movie. It’s not really inclusion if you continue to keep the core cast uniform and just “include” token characters on the fringes. That’s why the Supergirl TV series making Jimmy Olsen black was a better choice than introducing some new minor character to be “the black guy.” The Superman comics tried that with Ron Troupe, and, well, if you’re asking “Ron who?”, then that makes my point for me.

Also, it can be argued that the Sulu of the Kelvin Timeline (I’m so pleased to have an official name for the new movies’ universe now) doesn’t need to have the same orientation as the Sulu of the Prime universe. The Star Trek Chronology conjecturally puts Sulu’s birth in 2237, four years after the timelines split. So even if he’s genetically the same individual (which he doesn’t necessarily have to be, since he could’ve been conceived at a different time, like how Chekov is four years older in this reality), the hormonal and epigenetic factors shaping his pre-natal development could’ve been different, giving him a different orientation — like several of the Leda clones on Orphan Black (Alison is hetero, Cosima is lesbian, Sarah is at least situationally bisexual, Tony is transgender, etc.).

Honestly, we don’t even know for sure that Prime Sulu was heterosexual. By happenstance (or more likely because of racial prejudices that still linger today), Sulu was the one member of the main cast who was never given a romantic subplot. Leila Kalomi in “This Side of Paradise” was going to be Sulu’s love interest (hence her “exotic” name), but was then rewritten to be Spock’s and cast as a blonde woman. He was shown to be affected by the allure of “Mudd’s Women” and “The Lorelei Signal” along with all the other men in the crew, and in the extended cut and novelization of ST:TMP, he’s flustered and aroused by Ilia’s Deltan sex appeal — but it’s worth noting that those were all superhumanly arousing women, so it doesn’t prove that ordinary women would get a rise out of him. A lot of people strongly prefer one sex but are capable of occasional interest in the other.

I don’t count Sulu’s “fair maiden” reaction to Uhura in “The Naked Time,” because he was role-playing as D’Artagnan. Nor do I count “Mirror, Mirror” Sulu’s harassment of Uhura, both because that was another alternate version and because sexual harassment is more about power than attraction. (For all we know, Mirror Sulu harassed Chekov the same way when the camera wasn’t looking.) So that just leaves the somewhat creepy moment in “The Magicks of Megas-tu” where Sulu used the alternate dimension’s “magical” physics to conjure up an illusory woman that he tried to kiss. On the bridge. In front of everybody. Honestly, that’s just wrong on so many levels that I’m happy to ignore it. (I disregard the whole episode anyway. It’s steeped in the Hoylean continuous-creation cosmology that had already been discredited in favor of the Big Bang even at the time, and is now as archaic as a story about canals on Mars or dinosaur-filled jungles on Venus.)

Honestly, when George Takei first came out publicly years ago and I heard people say “So should Sulu be gay now?” I thought he shouldn’t be, because the actor and the character are two different people, and gay actors shouldn’t be typecast as only playing gay characters. But of course, Sulu is now played by a different, heterosexual actor, so that ameliorates it somewhat. And I can see the logic that, since Sulu is the only character who never explicitly had a heterosexual relationship onscreen, he’s the most likely candidate, even aside from who played him. Indeed, David Gerrold commented recently that he always read Sulu as gay.

Things get trickier when you bring the tie-ins into it, because a number of books and comics have shown Sulu in heterosexual relationships, including with Mandala Flynn in Vonda McIntyre’s The Entropy Effect (the book that coined his first name Hikaru), Demora’s mother Susan Ling in Peter David’s The Captain’s Daughter, M’Ress and Kathy Li in Peter David’s DC comics, and a Tokugawa-era concubine in the time-travel novel Home is the Hunter by Dana Kramer-Rolls. True, the books and comics have never had a single, uniform continuity, and the only one of those stories that’s really compatible with the modern novel continuity is The Captain’s Daughter (which I referenced in Ex Machina and Watching the Clock, and which established the characterization of Enterprise-B captain John Harriman that David R. George III has expanded on in several later works). That one’s kind of tricky to get around, given its importance. Still, I expect Sulu’s newly established characterization in Beyond will be reflected in how future novelists write him. As has happened in the past, any inconsistencies will either be glossed over or explained away. After all, anything else would feel like moving backward.

How well do I Bechdel?

Over the past couple of years there’s been a lot of discussion about representation and diversity in genre media in various contexts, such as the debate over the past two years’ Hugo nominations, the importance of Mad Max: Fury Road, the excitement about the Wonder Woman movie and the frustration about the delay in getting female-led Marvel movies, and so on. It got me curious to see how well my writing measures up by one standard of representation, the Bechdel test. This is a metric popularized by cartoonist Alison Bechdel as a way of assessing how well women are represented in media — or, rather, of revealing how poorly they are represented in American movies overall.

A work of fiction passes the Bechdel test if it meets three criteria:

  1. It includes at least two named female characters…
  2. who have a conversation with each other…
  3. about something other than a man.

Now, whether an individual work passes the test isn’t necessarily an indicator of whether it’s feminist or portrays women in a positive light. The classic illustration is that Gravity fails the test while Showgirls passes. And certainly not every story has to pass it to be worthwhile; for instance, one of my favorite movies, 12 Angry Men, is an obvious fail just from the title. (There have been versions with women in the cast, but they’d still technically fail because all the characters are unnamed.) Its use, rather, is in the aggregate, to help assess how well or poorly women are represented in an overall genre or body of work. Which is why I plan to apply it to my whole body of published work, though it’s taken me a while to slog through the whole list.

Some of my shorter works would fail Bechdel due to not having enough characters overall, so it’s worth bringing in the related “Mako Mori test.” This test, named for the female lead in Pacific Rim, was conceived to fill the gaps in the Bechdel test for films like Gravity or Pacific Rim in which there’s only one significant female character, but that character is still presented in a strong and positive way, as an independent protagonist in her own right. The parameters for a work of fiction to pass the Mako Mori test are:

  1. It includes at least one female character…
  2. who has her own narrative arc…
  3. that isn’t about supporting a male character’s arc.

I don’t think this excludes the female character from supporting any male character at all — just that she have her own personal goal driving her, rather than being motivated solely by helping a man achieve his goals. Mako does support Raleigh as his partner, and vice-versa, but she has her own independent motivation and quest that would have still been present even without Raleigh being there.

So I think I’ll start with my original fiction, in publication order.

“Aggravated Vehicular Genocide”: Passes Bechdel. There are two human female characters, Captain Cecilia LoCarno and the bit player Zena Bhatiani. The AI Arachne identifies as female, and the Chirrn captain/prosecutor Rillial is “currently female.” Bhatiani and Arachne briefly converse about the possibility of communication with the aliens. Cecilia, Rillial, and Arachne converse about the disaster; Cecilia and Bhatiani discuss language; Cecilia and Rillial debate in the trial.

“Among the Wild Cybers of Cybele”: Fails Bechdel because there are only three speaking characters, two of them male. Passes the Mako test since Safira Kimenye is the central character and her actions in defense of the titular cybers drive the story.

“The Hub of the Matter”: Fails Bechdel, as Nashira Wing is the only female character. Mokak Vekredi is hermaphroditic but identifies as male, and Nashira’s conversations with him are about David LaMacchia. I think it passes the Mako test; as with Mako herself, Nashira’s storyline intertwines with David’s and supports his to an extent, but she does have her own independent agenda informing her actions, which is somewhat at odds with David’s.

“The Weight of Silence”: Fails Bechdel by having only two speaking characters, one male, one female. The female lead Monali Chen is the narrator and lead character, but her arc is halfway about rescuing herself and her copilot boyfriend and halfway about rescuing their relationship. But I think it’s more a case of him supporting her arc than the other way around. Call it a half score Mako-wise.

“No Dominion”: Passes Bechdel. Lead character Tamara Craig interviews a female witness about her female roommate’s attempted murder and about her research, though Craig’s male colleague participates.

“Home is Where the Hub Is”: Passes, though not by much. Nashira and female alien Commander Relniv discuss the discovery of a new Hubpoint, though David and Rynyan then intrude on the conversation. Nashira briefly converses with another alien later identified as female, but it’s about David, and the alien isn’t named.

Only Superhuman: Solid pass. Multiple named female characters have conversations on a variety of subjects. For example: Emerald Blair and Bast taunt each other during combat; Emry and Koyama Hikari discuss their work and Emry’s bionic upgrades; Emry and Psyche Thorne have numerous conversations about politics, philosophy, sexual ethics, and more personal matters (some involving men, others not); etc.

“Make Hub, Not War”: Limited pass. Andrea LaMacchia and Aytriaew briefly discuss the quality of the latter’s relief supplies; Nashira and Aytriaew briefly discuss another relief mission (and revisit the topic later with David and Rynyan participating). Solid pass for Mako, as Aytriaew has her own strong agenda driving the story.

The Caress of a Butterfly’s Wing”: Barely passes first two Bechdel parameters, fails the third. Mostly a two-hander with a female viewpoint character, Mariposa, and her male love interest, like “Weight of Silence.” A conversation with an incidental female character named Kipepeo is only summarized and is largely about a man. Mako Mori-wise, same issues as “Weight.” Mariposa’s arc involves rescuing and relating to a man, but that’s largely in service to her own character growth. Comes closer to passing than failing, but I’m not quite sure.

“Murder on the Cislunar Railroad”: Passes Bechdel. Has two named human female characters, Jaya Ramanathan and Lam Hang Bian, and a female-identifying AI, Athena. Bian and Athena have at least two confrontations in which the male lead also participates (though he joins belatedly in the first one).

So out of 10 published original works to date, only 6 pass Bechdel at all, most of them poorly. Of the remaining four, two definitely pass Mako and two ambiguously pass it. This is unexpected, since I’ve always thought I tended to write strongly female-centric fiction. Indeed, 7 of these 10 stories are told primarily or exclusively from the POV of their female leads, and two others (the first two) have dominant female leads whose actions drive the narrative but who are perceived mainly through the male leads’ POV. “Cislunar” is probably my most strongly male-centric story in terms of POV and character gender ratio, yet the story is largely shaped by its female characters’ agendas. Still, my female leads tend to be paired off with male characters rather than other women, and are outnumbered by men more often than I’d realized. (To be fair, though, I don’t have many male-male pairings to speak of either, aside from David and Rynyan in the Hub stories.)

In the aggregate, I’d say I come out ahead, but not by nearly as much as I expected. This is what things like the Bechdel and Mako tests are good for — to identify blind spots and unconscious habits that have been overlooked.

There’s also a strong but unintentional tendency toward heteronormativity in these works, with Only Superhuman being the only one that features a same-sex relationship between lead characters (although there is passing discussion of a casual lesbian dalliance between supporting characters in “No Dominion” and a brief allusion to Mariposa’s bisexuality in “Butterfly’s Wing”, and added material in the Hub Space collection establishes David LaMacchia as bisexual). I’m already working to improve LGBTQ representation in future stories.

Moving on to tie-ins, let’s start with Marvel.

X-Men: Watchers on the Walls: Passes Bechdel. Multiple female X-Men including Jean Grey, Rogue, Shadowcat, and Storm, plus other female characters like Val Cooper, the alien leader Poratine, and the new female students at the Xavier Institute. Lots of conversations on various topics.

Spider-Man: Drowned in Thunder: I’d have to call it a fail. There are several named female characters who have conversations with each other, but all are about men, usually Spider-Man. There is one bit early on where one female student of Peter Parker’s makes a comment and another reacts to it with a wisecrack, but they’re both technically addressing Peter. So it’s only a 2/3 Bechdel pass. I don’t think it quite passes Mako; Mary Jane Watson-Parker has an independent narrative arc (drawn from the comics) involving her pursuit of a stage career, but it isn’t a major element of the story.

These results make sense, I’d say, since X-Men is an ensemble series with about an equal mix of male and female characters, while Spider-Man is a male-led solo series where basically every other character is there to relate to Peter/Spidey in some way. Again, it’s not necessary for every work to pass Bechdel; it’s more an aggregate assessment. And two works is too small a sample to get a meaningful aggregate result. Let’s call this a wash.

And finally Star Trek, again in publication order:

SCE: Aftermath: Passes Bechdel. Multiple named female characters, including Sonya Gomez, Domenica Corsi, Carol Abramowitz, and “Pattie” (P8 Blue), converse about the mission and strategies, though men participate as well. Gomez and female alien scientist Varethli have a heart-t0-heart.

DS9: “…Loved I Not Honor More”: Fails 2/3 of Bechdel and fails Mako. Only two named female characters (Grilka and Jadzia Dax), who do not interact and who are there to support Quark’s narrative arc.

TOS: Ex Machina: Passes, though not massively. Uhura, Reiko Onami, and Spring Rain discuss the latter’s past, goals, and physiological needs, as well as discussing Uhura and Reiko’s memories of Ilia. Also, High Priestess Rishala discusses politics and strategy with several named councillors of both sexes.

VGR: “Brief Candle”: Borderline pass. Captain Janeway grants a request from B’Elanna Torres. Marika Willkarah briefly debates with Torres whether a mission is too dangerous. (There’s also a scene where Marika and Torres both try to convince the Doctor to agree to a request from the latter, but they don’t talk to each other in that scene.)

Titan: Orion’s Hounds: Passes. Various interchanges, including: Melora Pazlar and Orilly Malar discussing the latter’s reasons for being aboard; Deanna Troi counseling Orilly (more than once); Deanna and the alien Oderi discussing the latter’s racial history; etc.

TOS: “As Others See Us”: Passes. Two female Sigma Niobeans, Admiral Deyin and Captain Nohin, have a lengthy discussion about an impending contact with native islanders. Deyin later has an exchange with the island matriarch.

TOS: Mere Anarchy: The Darkness Drops Again: Passes. Two female Payav, Raya elMora and Asal Janto, discuss their past friendship and current political opposition (though some men are discussed in connection with the political situation). They have a second confrontation later. Raya has another scene with her grandmother Elee and a young female protegee, Theena.

TNG: The Buried Age: Passes. Various interchanges, including: Stefcia Janos, Coray, and Xian Yanmei discuss how to enter an ancient ruin (with men participating); Kathryn Janeway, Stefcia, and Dr. Miliani Langford discuss how to penetrate a stasis field (ditto); Janeway and Ariel discuss rescuing more of Ariel’s people; Coray tries to recruit Ariel to her cause; etc.

TNG: “Friends With the Sparrows”: Fails 2/3 of Bechdel; there are at least three named women (Troi, Sofia Borges, Ambassador Denin), but they never converse. Not sure about Mako; Borges and Denin both have their own agendas, but narratively their arcs are in service to Data’s arc. I guess it depends on whether you define “supporting a man” in terms of a character’s intentions or in terms of her story function.

VGR: Myriad Universes: Places of Exile: Passes Bechdel. Vostigye Subspeaker Vitye Megon debates with Janeway and (separately) science minister Dobrye Gavanri about surrendering Voyager‘s crew to an enemy; Janeway converses with Vorta clone Kilana about a potential alliance; Annika Hansen convinces Janeway to let her take a risk; etc.

TNG: Greater Than the Sum: Passes Bechdel from the first page onward. T’Ryssa Chen wheedles Dawn Blair into putting her on an away team; Seven of Nine, Crusher, and Admiral Nechayev discuss Chen’s experience (with men participating); Miranda Kadohata clashes with Chen over her attitude; Crusher, Kadohata, Chen, and Jasminder Choudhury play poker (with Picard, La Forge, and Worf); etc.

TTN: Mirror Universe: “Empathy”: Fails part 3 of Bechdel. Christine Vale and Aili Lavena have conversations, but they’re primarily about men. Fails Mako, as they’re primarily there to support male characters’ arcs.

TTN: Over a Torrent Sea: Passes. Lavena, Vale, and Pazlar discuss the planet Droplet and its life forms (with males participating); Pazlar discusses their findings with various male and female crewmembers; Lavena and Pazlar privately discuss the squales (and then start discussing a man, Dr. Ra-Havreii); etc.

DTI: Watching the Clock: Passes. Teresa Garcia and Clare Raymond discuss being displaced in time; Garcia and Dr. T’Viss discuss temporal physics; Garcia, Pazlar, Ellec Krotine, and Lirahn discuss the Axis of Time; Agent Shelan speaks with a time-displaced Dina Elfiki and later with Jena Noi; etc.

TNG: Typhon Pact: The Struggle Within: Passes. T’Ryssa Chen and Jasminder Choudhury interact repeatedly on Kinshaya mission; Crusher tries to reason with female rebels Velet and Dirin; etc.

DTI: Forgotten History: Passes, mainly just in the opening scenes. Garcia and Heather Peterson discuss Elysia (with one male, Ranjea, participating); Captain Alisov and Peterson discuss the subspace confluence; not much else.

ENT: Rise of the Federation: A Choice of Futures: Passes. Various work-related exchanges among T’Pol, Hoshi Sato, and Elizabeth Cutler. T’Pol and Sato are later held captive together and converse about their situation.

ENT: ROTF: Tower of Babel: Passes. More T’Pol/Sato/Cutler; T’Pol debates with Boomer leader Freya Stark; Sedra Hemnask and T’Rama discuss their careers (with Archer participating); etc.

DTI: The Collectors: Passes. Jena Noi converses with colleague Jeihaz about timeline changes, and interacts extensively with another female character (spoilers!).

ENT: ROTF: Uncertain Logic: Passes, though not massively. Val Williams converses with security subordinates including Julia Guzman and Katrina Ndiaye. Devna and the Deltan woman Pelia discuss their cultures’ approaches to sexuality, but only briefly in connection with men. Maybe a few other brief bits.

ENT: ROTF: Live by the Code: Passes, though not massively. More Williams/Ndiaye in action. Two female Vol’Rala bridge officers, Breg and zh’Vethris, discuss recent events on Breg’s home colony. A few group discussions among personnel of both sexes. (I’d expected I could count the scene where T’Pol, Sato, and Cutler confront Orion merchant princess Gyrai, and the scene where T’Pol confides a secret to Sato, but in both, the conversations are about male characters.)

I can also confirm limited Bechdel passes for my next two Trek works, DTI: Time Lock (in which the featured female guest character has some discussion with two established female cast members pertaining to the crisis) and TOS: The Face of the Unknown (barely, through brief exchanges between Uhura and a guest character and between two guest characters). Time Lock strongly passes the Mako test, but I think TFotU is borderline on that one.

So out of 21 published Trek works so far and 2 more to come (wow), every one passes at least part 1 of Bechdel. Only 3 fail Bechdel as a whole, at least 2 of which also fail Mako. That’s about 87% success, a very good record. Arguably better, since all three fails are novelettes. There are a number of borderline passes, though.

It’s worth noting that on the whole, the passes generally involve book-original characters or series, the exceptions being in TNG (Crusher and Nechayev), VGR (Janeway, Torres, Seven), and ENT (T’Pol, Sato, Cutler). For the most part, the Trek shows are fairly male-dominated, and the strong Bechdel showing of Pocket’s tie-in line is largely due to the efforts of its authors to improve the gender balance. My TNG works benefit from drawing on female characters introduced by previous authors (e.g. Keith DeCandido’s Kadohata and David Mack’s Choudhury and Elfiki).

I and other authors have also tried to counter the default heteronormativity of the Trek franchise to date by incorporating LGBTQ characters. I’ve included same-sex relationships as “onscreen” events or plot points in at least four works (“Empathy” and ROTF books 2-4) and included significant or incidental LGBTQ characters in at least nine more, including characters inherited from other authors (such as SCE’s Bart Faulwell and TTN’s Ranul Keru — and Jadzia Dax, probably the only canonically bisexual series regular in Trek). So I think I’m doing moderately well on that score, though as with my original work, it’s something I’ve been trying to do more of in recent years.

I’m honestly a little surprised that I’ve done a better job passing the Bechdel test in my tie-in fiction (where I expected to be somewhat hampered by the male-dominated casts of the source material) than in my original fiction (where I generally gravitate toward female leads and perspectives). But I think maybe that’s an artifact of the relative lack of long-form works in my original bibliography. Short stories only have room for a few characters and relationships, and I tend to pair off a male lead and a female lead, or have two of one and one of the other. So I do well on the Mako Mori test, but I think I’d do better on Bechdel if I had more original novels. Even so, there’s room for improvement in some respects. Of course the goal isn’t to try to mechanically fill some quota in every story, but this kind of assessment is good for keeping overall patterns in mind and identifying areas that could use more emphasis or more variety. At the very least, I’ve satisfied my curiosity.

LIVE BY THE CODE annotations are up, “Cislunar Railroad” coming soon (UPDATE: now up)

Okay, I’ve finally gotten around to doing my story notes and spoiler annotations for Rise of the Federation: Live by the Code. I’ve also restructured the site a bit, combining the individual book entries for ROTF on the same page (which still has “a-choice-of-futures” in its URL, since I didn’t know if I should change that). Here’s the master ROTF page, and you can scroll down to find the general notes on LBTC and the link to its spoiler notes. (I’ve kept the original pages for Books 2 & 3 in existence so I don’t break any links, but I’ve removed them from the top menu.)

I’ve also added a section on my new Analog story “Murder on the Cislunar Railroad” to my Original Short Fiction page. I’ll be adding spoiler notes for that story later.

“Murder on the Cislunar Railroad” has arrived!

I just got my author copies of the June 2016 Analog, containing my SF-mystery novelette “Murder on the Cislunar Railroad,” and I got my name on the cover again!

Analog SF&F June 2016 cover

Cover art by Bob Eggelton

So out of six Analog appearances over the past 17.5 years, I’ve gotten my name on the cover half the time — specifically, on the third, fifth, and sixth occasions. That’s kind of symmetrical. I’ve never had cover art based on one of my stories, though the covers these days usually seem to be generic space images. Four of my Analog stories have had interior art, though, the exceptions being “The Hub of the Matter” and this one.

It looks like I got my copies early; the  Analog homepage hasn’t yet been updated to June as of this writing. From what I can tell, the June issue goes on sale in about a week, on May 4. “Cislunar Railroad” is the last story in the issue, on pp. 92-103. I hope my readers find the mystery suitably confounding and the ideas and characters sufficiently interesting.

2016 Ohioana reception

This past Sunday, I attended the annual Ohioana Library Association reception for local authors at the Cincinnati Public Library’s main branch. Here I am accepting my certificate for Rise of the Federation: Uncertain Logic from Ohioana Hamilton County Committee chairman David Siders:

DSC_0380

And that photo pretty much tells me it was a mistake to wear slacks without a jacket. Or maybe I need better-fitted slacks. My hips aren’t really that bulgy.

There was nominally an opportunity to sell some books here, so I brought a few paperbacks, but the sale didn’t seem as well-organized as last year, and I ended up instead spending the whole post-reception time talking with other honorees, local folks I’ve met at earlier book events and got to reconnect with here. So it was more satisfying socially than financially, but that’s fine. I’ll get a better chance to sell books at the same location on May 21st, when I attend the Cincinnati Library Comic Con.

Once again, how many words?

Wow, I just realized it’s been over two years since I last did an overview of the word counts of my published fiction. So it’s high time for an update. This list includes all my paid, published work through September 2016 (including the upcoming “Murder on the Cislunar Railroad” and DTI: Time Lock, both of which have been copyedited, so their word counts are unlikely to change). I’ve left out the unpaid essays I’ve contributed to various sites, since it’s hard to keep track of them all, and I do so much unsolicited blathering online as it is.

ORIGINAL FICTION

Default universe:

Novels:

  • Only Superhuman: 118,000 words

Stories:

  • “Aggravated Vehicular Genocide”: 12,000
  • Among the Wild Cybers of Cybele”: 9400
  • “The Weight of Silence”: 7600
  •  “The Caress of a Butterfly’s Wing”: 8900
  •  “Murder on the Cislunar Railroad”: 8200

Total story count: 46,100 words

Total default universe: 164,100 words

Hub universe:

  • “The Hub of the Matter”: 9300
  •  “Home is Where the Hub Is”: 9800
  •  “Make Hub, Not War”: 9800
  •  Hub Space: Tales from the Greater Galaxy: 33,300 (preceding stories + 4400 words new material)

Total: 33,300 words

Other:

  •  “No Dominion”: 7900

Total original fiction count:  205,300 words

MARVEL FICTION

  • X-Men: Watchers on the Walls: 83,500
  • Spider-Man: Drowned in Thunder: 71,000

Total Marvel novel count: 154,500 words

STAR TREK FICTION

Novels:

  • Ex Machina: 110,000
  • Orion’s Hounds: 105,000
  • The Buried Age: 132,000
  • Places of Exile: 55,000
  • Greater Than the Sum: 78,500
  • Over a Torrent Sea: 89,000
  •  Watching the Clock: 125,000
  • Forgotten History: 85,500
  • A Choice of Futures: 81,000
  • Tower of Babel: 84,000
  • Uncertain Logic: 109,000
  • Live by the Code: 106,000

Total ST novel count: 1,160,000 words

Novellas:

  • Aftermath: 26,000
  • Mere Anarchy: The Darkness Drops Again: 28,900
  • Typhon Pact: The Struggle Within: 25,400
  • DTI: The Collectors: 35,400
  • DTI: Time Lock: 26,500

Total: 142,200

Novelettes:

  • “…Lov’d I Not Honor More “: 12,000
  • “Brief Candle”: 9800
  • “As Others See Us”: 9100
  • “Friends With the Sparrows”: 10,300
  • “Empathy”: 11,000

Total: 52,200

Total ST short fiction count: 194,400 words

Total ST fiction count: 1,354,400 words

STAR TREK MAGAZINE ARTICLES

  •  “Points of Contention”: 1040
  •  “Catsuits are Irrelevant”: 1250
  • “Top 10 Villains #8: Shinzon”: 820
  • “Almost a Completely New Enterprise”: 800
  • “The Remaking of Star Trek“: 1350
  • “Vulcan Special: T’Pau”: 910
  • “The Ultimate Guide: Voyager Season 3″: 1170 (not counting episode guide)
  • “Star Trek 45s #11: Concerning Flight”: 1000

Total article count: 8340 words

All told:

  •  Novels: 1,432,500 words
  • Short fiction: 281,700 words
  • Nonfiction: 8,340 words

Total fiction: 1,714,200 words

Total overall (rounded): 1,722,500 words

So I’m well on my way to my second million, and I’ve surpassed a million words’ worth of Star Trek novels alone. My default-universe content is close to catching up with my Trek short-fiction content and now surpasses my Marvel output. But my original fiction output constitutes less than 1/8 of my total published work, which is a ratio I still hope to improve on.

Other details: I have 15 published novels to date, with an average word count of 95,500 words. As of September 2016, I shall have 5 published novellas averaging 28,440 words, and 14 published novelettes averaging 9650 words (not counting the expanded Hub Space material).

And I’ve still never sold an actual short story (i.e. 7500 words or less)!

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